Obama's Re-Election Deal with Iran; Putting Politics Ahead of National Security

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 31, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama's Re-Election Deal with Iran; Putting Politics Ahead of National Security


Byline: Reza Kahlili, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Ever since President Obama took office, the idea of a grand bargain with Iran has occupied his mind, and still today he believes the Islamic regime will be kind to him and negotiate. He is woefully mistaken.

Mr. Obama's grand bargain, reinforced by his inner circle, calls for Iran to give up the idea of a nuclear bomb while continuing to pursue its peaceful nuclear program, help resolve the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and reconsider its terrorist activities worldwide.

Every recent U.S. administration had tried in vain to negotiate with the radicals in Iran. Mr. Obama remains blind to the fact that any negotiations or sanctions will fail because the Islamist regime is ideologically committed to the expansion of its ideals.

Last February, the Obama administration and the leaders of the Islamic regime held secret negotiations over an agreement that would pressure Israel not to attack Iran, avoid harming the fragile U.S. economy and help boost Mr. Obama's re-election chances. The agreement called for recognition of Iran's right to peaceful nuclear enrichment and that its nuclear program would have no military applications.

Mr. Obama requested collaboration with Iran through three channels: a letter to the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei; a message to the Iranian U.N. delegate; and a message through Swiss Ambassador Livia Leu Agosti in Tehran in a meeting with Iranian Foreign Ministry officials.

After the February talks, the U.S. took two steps in accord with the agreement. First, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, announced that Iran is a rational actor and that it is not after a nuclear bomb. Then, just as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was to arrive in Washington for talks with Mr. Obama about Iran, a consensus of 16 U.S. intelligence agencies was made public: Iran had stopped efforts to build a bomb.

For his part, Ayatollah Khamenei announced that Iran had never sought and would never seek nuclear weapons, as it regards their possession a great sin.

The meetings between the Islamic regime and the Obama administration continued, with several held in Washington with the regime's surrogates, which resulted in a secret meeting in Doha, Qatar, between Iranian and U.S. officials.

According to a source in Iran, a three-person delegation on behalf of the Obama administration traveled to Qatar about Oct. 1 and met with Iranian counterparts, including Ali Akbar Velayati, the former foreign minister and a close adviser to Ayatollah Khamenei on international matters, and Asghar Hejazi, the head of the intelligence and security divisions in Ayatollah Khamenei's office.

In that meeting, the U.S. delegation urged an announcement, even if only on a temporary nuclear deal, before the U.S. elections in order to help Mr. Obama get re-elected. A Romney presidency, the delegation said, would favor Israel, while Mr. Obama has stood up to Israel against attacking Iran. The regime's delegate was urged to understand that if Iran does not stand by Mr. Obama, Israel will attack.

Mr. …

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