RACE ROW DIDN'T COST ME MY JOB; Suarez Saga Not to Blame - Dalglish

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), November 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

RACE ROW DIDN'T COST ME MY JOB; Suarez Saga Not to Blame - Dalglish


Byline: CARL MARKHAM

FORMER Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish does not believe his handling of the Luis Suarez racism row cost him his job but admits he would do things differently in a similar situation.

The Scot was sacked at the end of last season after the club finished eighth in the Premier League, having won the club's first trophy in six years with victory in the Carling Cup.

However, the campaign was dominated by the Suarez issue which resulted in the Uruguay striker being banned for eight matches having been found guilty of racially abusing the Manchester United defender Patrice Evra.

Dalglish was criticised at the time for his belligerent defence of the player and the club's stance in general - ranging from the T-shirts the team wore at Wigan in support of Suarez to the statements which emanated from Anfield - also came under fire.

The Reds' former player and manager refused to shoulder all the blame for that approach, pointing the finger at more senior figures at the club.

Asked whether the Suarez saga cost him his job Dalglish said: "I don't think so. That was up to them (owners Fenway Sports Group).

"I can go to sleep at night knowing what I did I did to the best of my ability and if that does not come up to their expectations or they want to go in another direction - they own the club.

"The owners made the decision they thought was best for the club.

"They don't want to make a decision which is detrimental to the club because if they did that they would hang themselves because they have a huge investment in it.

"I think anything that is not done in a positive manner cannot help you but I was only the manager.

"There are other people with greater intelligence than me and greater responsibilities than me when it comes to something like this.

"I think (it was) the club as a whole. …

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