Outside the Regular Classes; Parents Find Home Schooling,distance Education Work Well

Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia), November 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Outside the Regular Classes; Parents Find Home Schooling,distance Education Work Well


Byline: Nicole Fuge

THE belief home school and distance education children are weird, unsocialised and not able to go to uni is an old-school way of thinking and a stigma Coast parents are eager to quash.

Kunam Mani preferred distance education over home schooling for her son Nimai as the curriculum was set by the Brisbane School of Distance Education and marked by a distance education teacher.

aI do self-directed learning as well ... that's the beauty of it, I can adjust the curriculum to suit his needs while still meeting the school's requirements,a she said.

aThe one-on-one attention has been really marvellous and I know him well in terms of how his mind works.

aIt's been really enjoyable watching him grow and it really surprised me at times with what he knows.a

On the other hand, Merryn Cosgrove of Eudlo found home schooling to be more suitable for her 10-year-old son and six-year-old daughter.

aMy son was already a fluent reader at four years old. He taught himself to read,a she said.

aHe did go to kindy and his teacher said you'll have trouble finding a school to keep him stimulated, he was already versed in reading.a

Mrs Cosgrove enrolled her son in school for six months, but found it wasn't working.

aHe wasn't stimulated enough and we felt we could do as good a job and we were catering to his own needs,a she said.

aSame with our daughter, the more we started into home schooling, the more we realised it was a fantastic option.a

Not only could Mrs Cosgrove choose the curriculum, she had the luxury of tailoring it to her children's needs and ability to move through the program at their own pace.

Ms Mani's son also went to a local kindy, but found he would be a bit lost in a classroom and not be attentive enough in a group situation.

She feared he would fly under the radar and not meet his full potential.

aBecause of his nature I know he would have been somebody with difficulty in a normal classroom,a she said.

aI didn't want that to happen, if he wasn't reaching his full potential, that's the worst feeling as a parent.

aI wanted him to get a running start and a positive educational experience.a

Ms Mani said she found distance education to be more suitable as Nimai would absorb knowledge while he was fully alert. …

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Outside the Regular Classes; Parents Find Home Schooling,distance Education Work Well
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