Spanish Language, Literature and Culture

Michigan Academician, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Spanish Language, Literature and Culture


Eres lo que Lees: Constantino Ponce de la Fuente y los Libros que Construyen al Hombre. Jacki Christopher, Westminster Theological Seminary, Estudios Teologicos

Los regimenes represivos siempre han entendido que la palabra escrita tiene poder y, por esta razon, la censura de lo escrito ha acompanado a este tipo de regimenes. Constantino Ponce de la Fuente, predicador, academico y escritor del siglo XVI, fue un hombre profundamente influido y formado por sus lecturas. Mas an, la lectura de la Biblia y las obras de los Reformadores europeos lo situaron en la otra orilla de la ortodoxia catolica, en contra de la iglesia establecida--una decision fatal. Los libros polemicos que contenfa su biblioteca personal--los que le situaron como Reformador--determinaron, entre otras razones, que Constantino cayera bajo las garras del Santo Oficio. Los libros que guardo cuentan la historia de la lucha de teologias, poder y control que caracterize la Sevilla del siglo XVI, la palabra que endurece y la verdad por la que vale la pena sacrificarse.

En Busca del Narrador No Fidedigno de "El Regreso". Cynthia Slagter, Calvin College, Spanish Department

"El regreso" de Francisco Ayala es un cuento sobre un exiliado espanol que vuelve a su tierra natal buscando respuestas a las cuestiones pendientes de la guerra civil. Sin embargo, desde la primera pagina el lector se da cuenta que el narrador no es de fiar y que le esti manipulando. Aunque el narratario tiene que aceptar las palabras del narrador como verdad, el lector implicito es consciente de esta manipulacion y se rebela contra ella, rechazando la imagen ofrecida por el narrador y, en lugar de ella, presta atencian a los silencios y reconoce como exageraciones las descripciones. El narrador no fidedigno se hace patente a traves de su manipulacion de texto, los errores que hace, las inconsistencias en su historia, y el subjetivismo de su relato. Al final de la narracion el lector ha creado una imagen del narrador como una persona cuyas normas y creencias se apartan radicalmente de las del autor implicito.

Crossing National Borders: Romantic Religious Ideology in Byron, Espronceda, and Zorrilla. Anita Greenfield, Calvin College, Spanish Department

Focusing on Romanticism as a broader European movement rather than a movement specific to an individual country, my essay will examine the religious aspects of three Romantic works written in two different countries, Byron's Don Juan, Espronceda's El estudiante de Salamanca, and Zorrilla's Don Juan Tenorio. Through examination of the changes made in the Romantic works that differentiate them from the original story of the Spanish legend, don Juan, El burlador de Sevilla, written by Tirso de Molina in the 1600s, my essay will argue for a predominant trend in Romantic religious thought found in all three works: the inflated importance of human kind and the diminished presence of God. Through examination of the three chosen Romantic works, I will prove this religious trend, an international characteristic of Romantic works.

Long-Term Impacts of Off-Campus Programs: A Case Study. Elise Ditta, Calvin College, Spanish/International Development, Cynthia Slagter, Calvin College, Spanish Department, Don DeGraaf, Calvin College, Off-Campus Programs

The last 20 years has seen an explosion of off-campus study programs throughout colleges and universities in the United States. In advertising these experiences to students a number of life changing benefits have been promoted. Despite these many claims, few empirical studies have examined the long-term impacts of off-campus study. To begin to address this void the University of Minnesota has initiated a long-term research project entitled SAGE (Study Abroad for Global Engagement) that examines the long term personal, professional and social capital outcomes associated with study abroad experiences that occur during the college years. The study reported in this session mirrors the SAGE study at a liberal arts institution.

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