Teachers College Community School Finds Collaborative Success

By DeNisco, Alison | District Administration, November 2012 | Go to article overview

Teachers College Community School Finds Collaborative Success


DeNisco, Alison, District Administration


The Teachers College Community School (TCCS), a university-assisted public pre-K8 school, opened the doors of its new permanent home in West Harlem, N.Y. in September. The school, which initially opened in fall of 2011 in a different location, represents a unique collaboration between the Columbia University Teachers College and the New York City Department of Education to provide a strong public education for members of the community, as well as education training for university students.

Teachers College President Susan H. Fuhrman says the first year was a successful one: for the kindergarten class, which was the only grade attending the school last year, 78 percent performed at or above grade level in reading, 90 percent did so in writing, and 88 percent in math. They were based on the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project assessments, evaluations created for the NYC Department of Education and used throughout the city.

TCCS has 125 students in pre-K1 and will grow by one grade each year to full capacity in grades pre-K8. It is a non-selective public school filled by lottery, with admissions preference given to families in Harlem Community School Districts 5 and 6. The school received 230 applications for the 50 kindergarten seats this year; 175 of them came from that area. The 180 children who did not get in were put on a waiting list.

The school also serves as an important professional development site for the Teachers College. …

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Teachers College Community School Finds Collaborative Success
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