Amish Communities on a Growth Spurt

By Blackwell, Brandon | The Christian Century, September 19, 2012 | Go to article overview

Amish Communities on a Growth Spurt


Blackwell, Brandon, The Christian Century


The Amish are one of the fastest-growing religious groups in North America, according to a new census by researchers at Ohio State University.

The study, released July 27 at the annual meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, reports that a new Amish community sprouts up about every three and a half weeks. Nearly 250,000 Amish live in the U.S. and Canada, and the population is expected to exceed 1 million around 2050.

The growth may not be visible outside Amish country, but the rural settlements definitely see the boom. "This place has grown," said Daniel Miller, 52, who has spent his life on an Amish settlement. "It's because of all of the kids."

Many Amish families have multiple children, Miller said, adding that those children often stay in the community and eventually have families of their own.

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There are currently 99 church districts, or communities, in Middlefield, which is east of Cleveland in central northeast Ohio. Miller said he remembers when there were fewer than 20.

The Amish double their population about every 22 years, said Joseph Donnermeyer, the Ohio State professor who led the census project as part of the 2010 U.S. Religion Census.

The skyward growth has made Ohio home to more than 60,000 Amish residents--the most in any state. …

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