The Complex Regulation That Can Revolutionize Risk

By Adams, John | American Banker, November 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Complex Regulation That Can Revolutionize Risk


Adams, John, American Banker


Byline: John Adams

As part of its implementation of the Dodd-Frank law, the Federal Reserve is regularly collecting a large amount of granular information on corporate loan portfolios, a practice thatas causing short-term headaches for data managers, but in the long term should provide benefits for risk managers.

The Fed's new form, FR Y-14Q, requires banks to disclose transaction data for commercial and industrial loans (C&I), small to medium size business loans (SME) and commercial real estate loans (CRE). Any bank holding company with more than $50 billion in consolidated assets must provide quarterly reports that include detailed information on loan portfolios. That information is used as part of supervisory stress test models and to measure actual vs. forecast information.

The problem is that for most banks, the required data either resides in different data sources, or is populated differently in separate data sources. These different data sources can include financial statement spreads a programs that analyze financial statements to track performance over time a and the institutionas loan accounting system, which collects data on payments and transactions.

aInstitutions now have to, on a quarterly basis, submit loan-level information to the Fed that includes not only the name of the borrower and loan exposure, terms and conditions, but also [financial data] associated with those borrowers. And sadly, at most institutions the loan accounting system and financial spread analysis has been siloed and isnat integrated together,a says Brad Saegesser, a director at Moodyas Analytics. Moodyas KMV RiskAnalyst provides financial statement spreading, along with competitors such as Tyler Analytics and Peldec Decision Systems.

The Fed is collecting data on bank holding companiesa asset classes (types of businesses or loans), net revenue before loss provisions, securities risk, retail risk, wholesale risk, private equity, regulatory capital instruments, along with other Basel III and Dodd-Frank disclosures.

Saegesser says that in cases where this information is located in different systems, or is populated differently, thereas not an easy technology solution to integrate the data quickly or to ensure accuracy without manual inspection. aThere is no magic silver bullet to do thata[bar]youare talking about two different systems that have different identifiers for the same company when that company appears in each system,a he says. …

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