Wang, V. C. X. (Ed.). (2009). Curriculum Development for Adult Learners in the Global Community, Volume II: Teaching and Learning

By Rhodes, Christy M. | Adult Learning, August 2012 | Go to article overview

Wang, V. C. X. (Ed.). (2009). Curriculum Development for Adult Learners in the Global Community, Volume II: Teaching and Learning


Rhodes, Christy M., Adult Learning


Wang, V. C. X. (Ed.). (2009). Curriculum Development

for Adult Learners in the Global Community, Volume

II: Teaching and Learning. Malabar, FL: Krieger

Publishing Company. 222 pp. ISBN 978-1-57524-300-2

(hardcover).

Among the plethora of books about curriculum development, few reflect the andragogical tenets that adult educators have come to embrace. Editor Victor Wang successfully incorporates andragogy into curriculum development, while also utilizing a globalist perspective in his Curriculum Development for Adult Learners in the Global Community, Volume II. Teaching and Learning. The second of a two-volume series, this book accomplishes the editor's goal of providing a "current, practical, international, and adult learning based approach to designing and developing curriculum" (p. 2). With each chapter offering innovative theories and practical applications, it is a useful and timely text for all areas of adult educators.

Part one includes three chapters that explore the connection between culture and curriculum development. In chapter one, Guy presents a clear and compelling explanation of the role culture plays in the adult classroom. To help educators assess their own practice for cultural biases, he includes a list of six reflective questions, a thorough description, and examples of five forms of racial, class-based, and gender-based curricular biases. In chapter two, Alfred suggests six specific strategies for curricular design that acknowledges and incorporates recent demographic changes in the United States. Her description of transnational identities of today's immigrants is a must-read for educators of a nonimmigrant cultural background. Zheng's case study of English language education in China in chapter three provides a global example of curriculum development and concludes the first section.

In part two, authors explore the effects of globalization and focus on emerging adult learning methods. King sets the stage with her definition of the globally competent learner, describing specific competencies, and presents her view of what adult learning and teaching should look like. She ends the chapter with an extensive list of resources, including professional organizations, journals, websites, and more. …

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