Newsmaker: John Chrastka

American Libraries, November-December 2012 | Go to article overview

Newsmaker: John Chrastka


John Chrastka, ALA's director of membership development from 2003 to 2011, didn't leave library advocacy behind when he resigned from ALA to devote more time to his start-up consulting agency. First, he was already on the board of the Berwyn (Ill.) Public Library (where he has served for six years). And now, in characteristically maverick fashion, Chrastka has launched a national library political action committee (PAC), EveryLibrary.org, to help public, school, and academic libraries get ballot initiatives passed in 2013 and beyond. Chrastka discussed his vision with AL Senior Editor Beverly Goldberg on October 5.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

AMERICAN LIBRARIES: Why did you take on such an ambitious endeavor as forming a national library PAC? JOHN CHRASTKA: There is a gap in library advocacy that can only be addressed by a PAC. The gap happens because of IRS regulations about political speech by 501(c)(3) groups and associations such as ALA, the Urban Libraries Council, OCLC, and the Gates Foundation. State libraries--and the local library itself--cannot use tax money to fund a get-out-the-vote campaign. Under current law and regulation, the library community needs a national PAC to support a local library when it is on the ballot. From my years as a library trustee, as a former ALA staffer who knows the advocacy ecosystem personally, and as a political junkie, I am in a good position to make it happen.

How many library campaigns do you expect EveryUbrary will be able to support in its first year? Every single one that is on the 2013 ballot through the new, free, and fully customizable campaign tools we will create for library campaigns. We plan on print, email, and surface-mail templates, phone and door-to-door canvassing scripts, web-quality video and audio files, and high-resolution art for yard signs and billboards. We also plan to rally volunteers to help staff phone banks for certain campaigns. As we build funding, we'll add voter segmentation and analytics.

Has anything like this been attempted before? When I started planning EveryLibrary. I commissioned a white paper covering the last 10 years of library PACs to make sure 1 wasn't encroaching on any existing national projects.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Newsmaker: John Chrastka
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.