What They Said

American Libraries, November-December 2012 | Go to article overview

What They Said


"In this difficult economic climate, public libraries fill a critical need in the community. For years, we've had library users who expressed interest in a way to show their support for libraries of all kinds--public, academic, and special libraries. This new license plate is a great way to do that."

LINDA KOMPANIK, chair of the Kentucky Library Association's Library Awareness Committee and director of Logan County Public Library, on spearheading the effort to get the state to issue "Support Kentucky's Libraries" license plates.

"The truth is, I don't know why brick-and-mortar libraries still serve a purpose. I could have checked out the ebook version, but instead, sitting somewhere in the mid-800s of nonfiction, I have found a perfect location, just light enough to read but shielded from passersby. Turning the thick, dinner-stained pages of Ramona the Pest, the dust jacket crinkles, and within a single chapter I am 8 again. This is my third place; my place between work and home where I belong. And sitting here is why I continue to fight for public libraries."

CHELS KNORR, "Why Do We Still Need Public Libraries?" Thought Catalog, Sept. 30.

"'She's a librarian,' Sim said. 'They're not teachers; don't give you half as much hassle. If there's a fire in the school and I've got to choose who I'm gonna save--a teacher or a librarian--the teacher's gonna burn every time.'"

KEITH GRAY, Ostrich Boys (Random House Books for Young Readers, 2010), p. 24.

"I will only record now that every time I stepped into the Rice library [Rice Institute, later Rice University, in Houston] I felt a mingled sense of security and stimulation--a rightness of some sort. I felt that I had found my intellectual home and began to relax in ways that had not been possible on the ranch, even after I got old enough not to have to worry about the poultry."

LARRY MCMURTRY, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen: Reflections at Sixty and Beyond (Simon & Schuster, 1999), p. 66-67.

"We need to replace the dusty shelves and crusty books with more desks, conference rooms, and computer terminals. Computers are the new gateways to the vast sea of human knowledge, and the library's floor plan should reflect that fact. Keep the books, but store them in an off-site depository. …

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