Bullying Is Not Just Something That Goes on in the School Yard; Vikki Butler Is Senior Research and Policy Officer within the Research and Policy Unit at Barnardo's Cymru. She Leads in the Policy Areas of Education and Diversities and Her Current Research Includes Anti-Bullying Practice and Bullying Experiences in Wales

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), November 19, 2012 | Go to article overview

Bullying Is Not Just Something That Goes on in the School Yard; Vikki Butler Is Senior Research and Policy Officer within the Research and Policy Unit at Barnardo's Cymru. She Leads in the Policy Areas of Education and Diversities and Her Current Research Includes Anti-Bullying Practice and Bullying Experiences in Wales


Byline: Vikki Butler

NOVEMBER 19 marks the start of anti-bullying week in Wales. Many schools will be undertaking assemblies and classroom activities to support their anti-bullying policies and curriculum teaching.

But what do children and young people say about bullying and what do they think can really help them to stand up to bullying? Barnardo's Cymru research involves talking to children and young people about the complex nature of bullying.

Children and young people have described how being bullied affects their confidence, ability to learn and friendships. Bullying has other devastating impacts, such as influencing decisions regarding what subjects to study, causing young people to avoid certain areas at weekends and stopping children and young people from going out to play or taking part in leisure activities.

Technology can add to this relentlessness, with constant texting and messaging making the child or young person feel attacked within their own home. Young people rely on phones and social media to arrange their socialising with friends and to avoid using them is to face complete social isolation. Children and young people talk about the helplessness and guilt they feel when witnessing bullying. They face the difficulty of not joining in with bullying behaviours, of not wanting to walk by, but not knowing how to speak out. There is also the sometimes uncomfortable fact that bullies also need support - some will describe how they were joking and did not realise that the joke had become sinister.

Some talk of a sense of instant power followed by guilt.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bullying Is Not Just Something That Goes on in the School Yard; Vikki Butler Is Senior Research and Policy Officer within the Research and Policy Unit at Barnardo's Cymru. She Leads in the Policy Areas of Education and Diversities and Her Current Research Includes Anti-Bullying Practice and Bullying Experiences in Wales
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.