Lord Mandy of Ethics? Don't Make Me Laugh

Daily Mail (London), November 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

Lord Mandy of Ethics? Don't Make Me Laugh


Byline: Lit tlejohn richard.littlejohn@dailymail.co.uk

COMPOSER Tom Lehrer remarked that satire died the day Henry Kissinger was awarded the Nobel Peace prize. Kissinger was Richard Nixon's Secretary of State and had held a number of U.S. government offices, including director of nuclear weapons study and membership of the weapons systems evaluation group for the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

It doesn't get much more peaceful than that. So I wonder what Lehrer might have made of the news that Peter Mandelson has been appointed head of 'ethical' banking at Lazard International.

You couldn't make it up.

When it comes to 'ethics', the name of Mandelson is not one that you would expect to find in the same sentence.

This is a man who was twice forced to resign from government amid allegations of financial impropriety.

Mandelson, you may recall, lied to his building society in order to secure a monster mortgage on a house he couldn't afford without a secret [pounds sterling]373,000 loan from his wealthy Labour colleague Geoffrey Robinson.

He was extremely fortunate to avoid the attentions of the fraud squad, yet somehow managed to hold on to the profit when he had to dispose of the property.

Mandelson also employed a legal but highly dubious accounting trick to avoid having to pay the full whack of stamp duty on another home. Since then he has slithered his way up the property ladder and is currently residing in an [pounds sterling]8million pad next to London's Regent's Park. Quite a journey for a man who, when Labour went into government in 1997, was living in a onebedroom flat.

The source of his wealth is shrouded in mystery, since his income is shielded by a corporate structure and, until next March when this loophole is closed, does not have to be revealed in the House of Lords Members' Register of Interests.

Eyebrows were raised when he bought a previous house for [pounds sterling]2.4million while still a European Commissioner on a comfortable, butnot wildly extravagant, civil servant's salary.

Mandelson attempted to explain away where he had got the money from, but even back-of-the-envelope calculations didn't add up.

We do know that he seems to spend a considerable amount of time bogsnorkelling his way around the murky financial waters of former Soviet states.

He has interests in oil-rich Kazakhstan, for instance, and was introduced to the world of high finance by his close friend Nat Rothschild, of 'Yachtgate' fame. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lord Mandy of Ethics? Don't Make Me Laugh
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.