The Rioter's Veto: Can Violence in the Middle East Justify Censorship in the United States?

By Sullum, Jacob | Reason, January 2013 | Go to article overview

The Rioter's Veto: Can Violence in the Middle East Justify Censorship in the United States?


Sullum, Jacob, Reason


"In any war between the civilized man and the savage," says the ad, "support the civilized man. Support Israel. Defeat jihad."

On September 6, the American Freedom Defense Initiative (AFDI) signed a contract to buy space for this message from the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), which had concluded that the First Amendment required it to accept the controversial ad. Less than two weeks later, WMATA declared that AFDI's advocacy was not constitutionally protected after all, pointing to violent Middle Eastern protests blamed on Innocence of Muslims, an online video mocking the prophet Muhammad.

The idea that riots in other countries justify censorship in the U.S. represents a new form of heckler's veto, making freedom of speech contingent on the predicted responses of the touchiest listeners anywhere in the world. Such a policy is dangerous to freedom of expression, providing a license to suppress speech deemed provocative, and to public safety, encouraging violence aimed at eliminating offensive messages.

WMATA said it was indefinitely postponing placement of the AFDI ad because of concerns about "security and safety." Specifically, as U.S. District Judge Rosemary Collyer noted in an October 12 opinion explaining why she had overturned the transit authority's decision, "WMATA cited two ways in which the ad could threaten public safety: (1) inter-passenger disputes on subway platforms that could result in passengers falling into the tracks or (2) a terrorist attack."

Collyer mentioned no evidence supporting the first fear, which gives new meaning to the phrase "third rail of American politics." And the only evidence of a terrorist threat was a general warning from the Department of Homeland Security and the Transportation Security Administration's opinion that "WMATA's Metrorail system is a unique target because of its close association with the federal government."

Meanwhile, the same AFDI ad had appeared in the San Francisco and New York transit systems without prompting terrorism or platform fights in dangerous proximity to electrified tracks. …

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