Importance, Usage, and Preparedness to Implement Evidence-Based Practices for Students with Emotional Disabilities: A Comparison of Knowledge and Skills of Special Education and General Education Teachers

By Gable, Robert A.; Tonelson, Stephen W. et al. | Education & Treatment of Children, November 2012 | Go to article overview

Importance, Usage, and Preparedness to Implement Evidence-Based Practices for Students with Emotional Disabilities: A Comparison of Knowledge and Skills of Special Education and General Education Teachers


Gable, Robert A., Tonelson, Stephen W., Sheth, Manasi, Wilson, Corinne, Park, Kristy Lee, Education & Treatment of Children


Abstract

A growing number of students with emotional disabilities (ED) receive at least some of their instruction in general education classrooms. Accordingly, special education and general education teachers must be prepared to address the diverse academic and non-academic needs of students with ED. In the present study, we conducted a survey to identify teacher perspectives regarding the (a) importance, (b) amount of use, and (c) level of preparation regarding 20 evidence-based practices identified from a review of the literature. Survey results indicated that many special education teachers and general education teachers lack the necessary preparation to implement a number of evidence-based classroom practices effectively. Findings have major implications for preservice teacher education and in-service professional development.

KEYWORDS: behavior disorders; emotional disabilities; inclusion, general education teachers; special education teachers; evidence-based practices

By virtually any measure, students referred to as children and youth with "emotional/behavioral disorders," "emotional difficulties," or "emotional disabilities" (ED) are among the least successful of all students (Bradley, Doolittle, & Bartolotta, 2008; Kern, Hilt-Panahon, & Sokol, 2009). Research suggests that students with ED rarely evidence significant educational progress (Kern et al., 2009; Lane, Barton-Arwood, Nelson, & Wehby, 2008; Nelson, Benner, Lane, & Smith, 2004) and, in some instances, performance deficits actually worsen over time (Lane et al., 2008). Students identified as ED earn lower grades, are retained more often, fail more minimum competency exams, have higher rates of absenteeism, receive a greater number of office disciplinary referrals, and are suspended or expelled in greater numbers than are any other students (e.g., Kern, Hilt, & Gresham, 2004; Landrum, Tankersley, & Kauffman, 2003; Lane et al., 2008). Not surprisingly, according to the U.S Department of Education in the National Longitudinal Transition Study--2 (2011), students with ED have the second lowest high school completion rate (36.7%) and the highest drop-out rate (44.9%) among the students in 13 categories of disability. A possible contributing factor is that neither general education nor special education teachers have been prepared adequately to serve students with ED (Billingsley et al., 2006; Wagner et al., 2006; Simpson, Peterson, & Smith, 2011).

In the past, many students with ED were educated in self-contained classrooms, separate or alternative schools, or in residential facilities (Webber & Plotts, 2008). Today, more students with ED are being taught alongside their peers without disabilities in general education classrooms (Bradley et al., 2008). About 25% of students with ED spend 79% or more of their school day in a general education classroom (Bradley et al., 2008). Nearly half of all students with ED still are taught outside the general education classroom (Webber & Plotts, 2008). The disparity between the number of students with ED and number of students with other disabilities educated in inclusive settings may be attributable to the challenges posed by this population of students (Billingsley et al., 2006; Cook, 2002; Wagner et al., 2006).

Regardless of the educational setting, outcome data on students with ED are not positive (Landrum et al., 2003; Lane et al., 2008; Simpson et al., 2011). Data suggest that the aberrant behavior of students with ED adversely affects not only their academic achievement and social relationships, but also their post-secondary adjustment. Post-school outcomes for youth with ED are punctuated by high rates of unemployment or underemployment and lower wages earned compared to their disabled and nondisabled counterparts (Bradley et al., 2008; Simpson et al., 2011). Three to five years after leaving school, half of all students with ED are unemployed (Bradley et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Importance, Usage, and Preparedness to Implement Evidence-Based Practices for Students with Emotional Disabilities: A Comparison of Knowledge and Skills of Special Education and General Education Teachers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.