Ex-Presidents May Get Secret Service for Life

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Ex-Presidents May Get Secret Service for Life


Byline: Stephen Dinan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Two decades ago, with the Cold War receding and the world looking like a much less dangerous place, Congress passed a bill canceling former presidents' Secret Service protection 10 years after they left office, beginning with George W. Bush.

But now, with the war on terrorism presenting new dangers and presidents taking more active roles around the globe, Congress is poised to do an about-face.

The House is expected to vote Wednesday on a bill restoring lifelong Secret Service protection to all former presidents.

The increased mobility and youth of still-living former presidents, coupled with the national security threat posed to post-9/11 leaders who were instrumental in the war on terror, necessitates protection for life, as has been the case since the 1960s, said Rep. Trey Gowdy, the South Carolina Republican who is sponsoring the bill.

It's unclear what the cost would be because the Secret Service does not provide numbers. Nor is it clear what is driving the bill because Mr. Bush has another six years before he would lose his security detail.

Dan Emmett, a former Secret Service special agent and author of Within Arm's Length, his memoir of 21 years on duty, said there is no reason why former presidents need the extra protection. He said five years should be enough.

Protecting former presidents is phenomenally expensive and largely a courtesy rather than a necessity, said Mr. Emmett, who was in the Secret Service from 1983 through 2004. Although an attack on a former president could happen any day, it is highly unlikely.

The bill on the House floor hasn't drawn much attention, and it is coming up for debate under expedited rules that usually are used for noncontroversial measures. It has the support of the top Republican and Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee.

But its justification is less clear.

A Judiciary Committee staffer referred questions about the need for the law to the Secret Service, and a service spokesman declined to go into any details.

This issue's been worked on with several congressional committees as the 10-year limitation on protection approaches, spokesman Ed Donovan said. We currently protect all former presidents and we feel it's appropriate we continue to do so.

The Secret Service is an agency in the Homeland Security Department and either the president or the department's secretary can sign an order granting protection on an as-needed basis, which could be used when ex-presidents travel overseas on ambassadorial missions.

Mr. Donovan declined to say why that arrangement wouldn't work.

In addition to the sitting president and vice president and their immediate families, the Secret Service protects former Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, Mr.

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