GOP Should Fear Voters, Not the 'Fiscal Cliff'; Keep Fingerprints off Obama's Tax Hikes

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

GOP Should Fear Voters, Not the 'Fiscal Cliff'; Keep Fingerprints off Obama's Tax Hikes


Byline: Dr. Milton R. Wolf, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

How many times does Lucy have to pull away the football before Charlie Brown finally wises up and quits playing her game?Republicans don't have to keep falling for the Democrats' duplicity. The Democrats pretend the so-called fiscal cliff debate is about getting our financial house in order, so they propose a tax increase on people earning more than $200,000 a year (i.e., millionaires and billionaires in Democrat-speak), which will fund their leviathan government for all of - drumroll - four days.These are pathologically unserious people. Their goal is not to solve the current fiscal crisis. Their goal is to use the crisis to grow government and further their statist agenda which, incidentally, created the crisis in the first place. Recall Democrat Rahm Emanuel's unmasked moment of clarity: You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. Now, in hopes of enacting their panacea of tax increases, Democrats offer spending cuts that everyone knows never will happen. What's worse, the president calls for $255 billion in more spending. Only a Democrat would claim increased spending will reduce the deficit, and only a Republican would fall for it.The Democrats' lust for tax increases goes far beyond simple class warfare, as atrocious as that alone is. Democrats are fully aware that the rich already are paying more than their fair share. The wealthy (top 10 percent) may earn 50 percent of the income, but they pay 70 percent of the federal taxes. If that's not fair, what is? Eighty percent? One hundred percent?The Democrats' long game is to push an ever-increasing tax burden onto fewer and fewer taxpayers. This grows a class of Americans who may or may not earn paychecks but certainly become beneficiaries of government largesse while remaining blissfully detached from its enormous cost. (What's their fair share?) Economists would call this a recipe for disaster. Democrats would call it a voting base. Weak-kneed Republicans are poised to help them build it.What will follow is just as predictable: The economy will continue to suffer, the debt will continue to rise, and Democrats will blame Republicans. Why play their game? Republicans must reject compromises that (1) only hope to slow the Democrats' inexorable march toward statism and (2) absolve Democrats from blame. …

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GOP Should Fear Voters, Not the 'Fiscal Cliff'; Keep Fingerprints off Obama's Tax Hikes
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