Charities Could Be Losers in Tax Plan; Proposal Would End Deductions

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 7, 2012 | Go to article overview

Charities Could Be Losers in Tax Plan; Proposal Would End Deductions


Byline: Dave Boyer, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

In the fiscal feud between President Obama and Republican lawmakers, economists agree that Washington could raise several hundred billion dollars by limiting tax deductions and closing loopholes for the wealthy, but charities likely would take a big hit in donations.

At the center of the dispute between Mr. Obama and the GOP is whether they could raise enough revenue for a deal on deficit reduction without raising tax rates on families earning more than $250,000 per year.

Some economists say revenue could be raised on the order of $1 trillion over a decade without raising rates, more than the $800 billion proposed by Republicans but short of the $1.6 trillion sought by Mr. Obama.

The nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget has devised three proposals that would raise as much as $110 billion per year from taxpayers earning more than $200,000 per year without raising tax rates. For example, one option would cap all itemized deductions, the child tax credit and exclusions for employer-provided health insurance at 2 percent of a family's adjusted gross income, and also exclude interest deductions for state and local bonds.

The CRFB's proposals are a thorn in the side for Mr. Obama because the group's board includes prominent Democratic economic advisers such as Alice Rivlin, a former director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Clinton and a co-chairwoman of Mr. Obama's debt reduction task force in 2010.

Asked about the group's proposals this week, White House press secretary Jay Carney said he hadn't seen the specifics but added that such proposals generally are not feasible.

Rates on the top 2 percent, the wealthiest Americans, have to rise, Mr. Carney said Thursday. There is no deal without that acknowledgment [by Republican leaders] and without a concrete, mathematically sound proposal around which both sides can come together and get this done.

Mr. Obama has said the math of simply closing tax loopholes and deductions doesn't add up. And while CRFB's proposals would raise considerable revenue only from high earners, former Obama OMB director Peter Orszag went into more detail Thursday about why Democrats believe such an option isn't realistic.

Mr. Orszag cited an analysis by the left-leaning Tax Policy Center of a proposal to cap itemized deductions at $50,000. According to 2009 data from the IRS, wealthier households who claimed average deductions of $50,000 took 90 percent of their deductions from three main areas: mortgage interest, state and local taxes, and charitable contributions. Capping deductions, he said, would hit charitable giving hardest because it's the most discretionary of the three.

That's really where the bulk of the hit will come, Mr.

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Charities Could Be Losers in Tax Plan; Proposal Would End Deductions
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