Anti-English Views; & COMMENT DEBATE YOUR LETTERS TO THE NATIONAL NEWSPAPER OF WALES

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

Anti-English Views; & COMMENT DEBATE YOUR LETTERS TO THE NATIONAL NEWSPAPER OF WALES


SIR - I feel I have to respond to the general tenor of some of your correspondents and the just plain anti-English sentiments expressed - Dr Robyn Lewis in particular - who seems to (frequently) write such anti-English letters that it almost verges on racism.

However, as a tolerant Englishman I know there must be an underlying reason for this. I suppose I should ask why? We are in our late 60s and my wife's father worked at Saunder's Row in Beaumaris helping in the design of minesweepers for the war effort. She went to school in Bangor and the family lived near Bangor but had to move away because of economic demands. I have lived in Wales for 30 years and still fail to see why there is such bad feeling.

Just how long do we have to be here to qualify as local? Do we have to speak Welsh or are the other huge percentage, who don't, to be ostracised as well when we have to leave? We live in an area which is predominantly Welsh-speaking but that doesn't make for bad feeling; we try to help each other out in emergencies and we have robust discussions about rugby and other, lesser sports: it seems to be down to plain personal prejudice when people air such rabid opinions.

One wonders if some of the people who voice such inflammatory views are also the ones who are "trolls" on the internet. Some of your letters seem akin to bullying and I'm not sure it's always justified without rational argument.

If I were Muslim, black, or any other colour or race being abused as we are, I'm sure Brussels would be hot on the heels of some of your correspondents. These people would never approach an English person in the street and say the things they say in your newspaper.

Do these people really bear their own, personal grudge(s) or is it inherited from ancestral froth and just being promulgated because it's the "thing to do"? …

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