Stanching Dissent

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), November 7, 2012 | Go to article overview

Stanching Dissent


Byline: The Register-Guard

The Seattle suburb of Auburn put itself on the map by staging an annual Veterans Day parade. It began in 1965 and will be held again on Saturday. Billed as one of the largest Veterans Day parades west of the Mississippi River, the two-hour, milelong event is designated by the Veterans Day National Committee and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs as a Regional Site for the annual holiday.

This week the parade is in the national spotlight for another reason. It's being sued by the American Civil Liberties Union and a Seattle anti-war veterans' group whose members have marched in the six previous parades but have been denied participation this year.

The ACLU and Veterans for Peace say the denial violates the group's right to free speech.

Auburn City Attorney Dan Heid told The Seattle Times the parade has gotten so large that not all those wanting to participate can do so, but he acknowledged that the VFP's message runs counter to the parade's goals. "This is an Auburn parade with a pro-military message," he said. "The Veterans for Peace have a different message."

VFP in a national non-profit group founded in 1985 in response to the nuclear arms race and U.S. military interventions in Central America. It has more than 100 chapters nationwide and includes veterans from World War II to Iraq and Afghanistan.

Among its missions is to abolish war as an instrument of national policy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stanching Dissent
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.