Orchestra Next Would Develop Musicians into Professionals

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), November 8, 2012 | Go to article overview

Orchestra Next Would Develop Musicians into Professionals


Byline: Bob Keefer The Register-Guard

The whole thing got started when Brian McWhorter found out that Eugene Ballet wasn't using live musicians anymore for its Christmas performances of "The Nutcracker."

"To me that's almost a cardinal sin," said McWhorter, a professional trumpet player who teaches at the University of Oregon School of Music and Dance. "When I was in New York playing Broadway, we had to protest the Broadway houses' use of prerecorded music in shows.

"I was on the picket lines. I get kind of pumped up about this."

Although it had contracted in the past with musicians from the Eugene Symphony to play in its "Nutcracker" performances, Eugene Ballet - strapped, like most arts groups, by the recession - has used recorded music here for the last four years.

The obvious solution might have been to raise money for the ballet to hire musicians. McWhorter had another idea.

"What if I can get an orchestra together?" he said. "A training orchestra. A place where students can sit next to professionals."

Eugene has various levels of classical orchestras, from the Eugene Symphony and the Oregon Mozart Players on the professional end of the spectrum to the University Symphony and the various Arts Umbrella student orchestras in town. But none gives students the opportunity to perform side by side with working pros.

Enter Orchestra Next, McWhorter's idea. He's drafted 15 professional musicians to take on the principal roles and is looking for up to 30 students to take part. And after some discussion about the challenges involved, the Eugene Ballet has signed on enthusiastically, Managing Director Riley Grannan said.

"It's cool," Grannan said. "A training orchestra. A perfect thing for students. And I'm confident this will work."

Anything can happen

The challenges, of course, are many: The ballet's professional dancers will be performing a showcase work to music played by students led by a conductor - McWhorter himself - they've never dealt with on the podium.

The biggest problem, of course, is in the timing. Dancers love performing to taped music, because it never varies from one performance to the next.

In live music, anything can happen - and does.

"We're interested in the quality of the music," Grannan said. "There is a potential for train wrecks, so we've invested in this group by adding rehearsal time."

Using professional musicians playing a familiar work such as "Nutcracker," the ballet typically would do only one full rehearsal with the orchestra before the show. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Orchestra Next Would Develop Musicians into Professionals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.