Should Wales Be Responsible for Having Its Own Legal Jurisdiction? THURSDAY ESSAy an Assembly Committeeyesterday Reported on the Issues That Would Arise If Wales Had a Legal Jurisdiction Separate from That of England. Committee Chairman David Melding Explains the Thinking Behind the Inquiry and Outlines Its Main Findings

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 13, 2012 | Go to article overview

Should Wales Be Responsible for Having Its Own Legal Jurisdiction? THURSDAY ESSAy an Assembly Committeeyesterday Reported on the Issues That Would Arise If Wales Had a Legal Jurisdiction Separate from That of England. Committee Chairman David Melding Explains the Thinking Behind the Inquiry and Outlines Its Main Findings


FOLLOWING the yes vote in the referendum on extending the National Assembly for Wales' law-making powers in May 2011, we as the Assembly have yet to fully flex our new legislative muscles.

The Local Government Byelaws Act and the Official Languages Act, while worthy and necessary, haven't captured the public imagination in the way future legislation may seek to.

The Human Transplantation Bill which is currently making its way through the Assembly's legislative process is already engaging people in a completely different way.

This, after all, is the Bill that would change the system of organ donation in Wales from the current one in which people opt-in to donating their organs, to one which would require people to opt-out if they didn't want to donate.

An emotive subject such as this will bring into sharp relief that we in Wales have the power to choose our legislative direction.

It will be a demonstration of how, increasingly, there are differences between the legal landscapes of England and Wales.

No wonder then that the Welsh Government is looking at the question of a Welsh jurisdiction.

It was time for the National Assembly to do so, too.

The guiding principle behind any consideration of a separate jurisdiction should be to bring greater access to justice for Welsh citizens.

It is fundamentally important that any future changes are not just seen as a matter of convenience to the legal profession, but benefit the people of Wales directly.

My committee colleagues and I believe that a separate legal jurisdiction in Wales is constitutionally viable.

But any decision taken on this is a political one.

It should be made with the best interests of Wales and its people at its heart and it should only be taken after thorough consultation with, and the support of, those people.

A potential driver for this decision could be any future proposals for the National Assembly to take on powers over the administration of justice in Wales - police, court system, probation, etc. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Should Wales Be Responsible for Having Its Own Legal Jurisdiction? THURSDAY ESSAy an Assembly Committeeyesterday Reported on the Issues That Would Arise If Wales Had a Legal Jurisdiction Separate from That of England. Committee Chairman David Melding Explains the Thinking Behind the Inquiry and Outlines Its Main Findings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.