U.S. Natural Gas Exports Could Break Russian Dominance; Sell to NATO and Support New Pipeline

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 14, 2012 | Go to article overview

U.S. Natural Gas Exports Could Break Russian Dominance; Sell to NATO and Support New Pipeline


Byline: Sen. Richard G. Lugar, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Deep winter is approaching in Eastern and Central Europe and the Caucasus, bringing with it the prospect of icy days and frigid nights. For our friends and allies in the region, it also brings a chilly reminder of their chronic overdependence for heat and power on natural gas from Russia, which has demonstrated a penchant for using energy as a weapon against its neighbors.

The good news is that recent trends have turned in favor of our NATO allies and other friends to break Russia's energy dominance. The United States can capitalize on these trends by using our newfound abundance of natural gas and pursuing smart, committed diplomacy in the region to help many nations diversify their energy imports.

Most countries in the eastern sector of the European Union - nearly all of them NATO members - as well as EU aspirants Ukraine and Moldova, are heavily dependent on Russian gas. In the past, Moscow has shown itself quick to use energy as a club to punish and coerce its neighbors - but the Russians overplayed their hand.

After too many threats and actual cutoffs by the Kremlin, the European Commission is going after the giant Russian state gas monopoly, Gazprom, for anti-competitive behavior and price-gouging. At the same time, European countries are turning to the Middle East for new, cheaper supplies of liquefied natural gas (LNG), which had been intended for the United States before our own shale gas revolution turned us from a nascent importer to a potential exporter. This has helped strengthen the Europeans' bargaining position with Russia.

These trends may not last, but they have opened a window for the United States, with our European allies, to advance broad natural gas diversification. The United States should move quickly to seize this opportunity.

As a first step, we should allow exports of U.S. natural gas, now abundant thanks to shale gas, to all our NATO allies. The United States has surpassed Russia as the world's largest natural gas producer. At current consumption rates, we have an estimated 100-year supply, and prices have fallen so low that new drilling activity is drying up. We easily could export some of this surplus as LNG without causing consumer gas prices to spike here at home. I have drafted the LNG for NATO Act, which would let America sell gas to our friends in NATO without going through the cumbersome export licensing requirements under current law. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Natural Gas Exports Could Break Russian Dominance; Sell to NATO and Support New Pipeline
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.