Radical Feminism Waging the Real War on Women; Telling Women What They Really Want

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 17, 2012 | Go to article overview

Radical Feminism Waging the Real War on Women; Telling Women What They Really Want


Byline: Joseph Heschmeyer, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Recently, four female servicemen and the Service Women's Action Network sued the Department of Defense over the military's combat-exclusion policy. They claim the policy, which does not allow women in most ground-combat situations, relies on outdated combat systems and that it impedes career opportunities for women serving in the U.S. military. The suit highlights some of the most troubling features of radical feminism, which conflates gender equality with gender interchangeability. According to this ideology, women aren't truly free until they're indistinguishable from men. Waging a real war on women, the movement has pitted itself against both science, which finds sexual differences throughout the animal kingdom, and women, who routinely express a preference for the gender roles that feminists assail.

One of the latest examples comes from a survey of undergraduates at the University of California-Santa Cruz on the question of marriage proposals. After interviewing 277 students, researchers found that no one - whether a single man or a single woman - preferred for the woman in a relationship to propose marriage. That unanimity is somewhat surprising, given the impact of decades of entrenched academic feminism on liberal universities like UC-Santa Cruz.

Instead of this unanimity providing a much-needed detente in the culture wars, institutional feminists cried foul. The study's authors warned darkly of the role that hidden power may play in many heterosexual romantic relationships. Jezebel's Laura Beck lamented this benevolent sexism was a bit of a bummer, while Slate's Amanda Marcotte blamed unquestioning adherence to sexist gender norms and women's fear of what happens to people who step outside of those norms.

These commentaries ignore the outcomes of the study, which found the opposite to be true. Instead of uncovering colleges full of women too timid to dream of proposing, they found women who were willing to propose but weren't thrilled at the prospect. That doesn't sound like women being dominated by the hidden power of heterosexual relationships or fear of stepping out of line. It sounds like women wanting men to behave like men when it comes to proposals and long-term commitment.

This is just one of several areas in which both sexes happily consent to certain gender roles. For another example, according to a 2007 Pew Research survey of families with minor children, 79 percent of mothers described their ideal situation as one in which they worked part time or not at all, while 72 percent of fathers preferred to work full time. …

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Radical Feminism Waging the Real War on Women; Telling Women What They Really Want
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