Evolution: An iPad App from the Natural History Museum

By Scott, Elspeth S. | School Librarian, Winter 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Evolution: An iPad App from the Natural History Museum


Scott, Elspeth S., School Librarian


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

This visually attractive and informative app covers the story of evolution from the beginnings of life. The main interface shows an arch framing clickable photographs mainly of fossils, but also including some human artefacts e.g. tools, cave paintings, carvings--to access further information. A menu on the left links to further sections and to other methods of exploring the app.

The Timeband is a continuous band in chronological order of beautiful drawings of fossil sites as they might have looked. The user can scroll through or use the smaller version at the bottom to jump quickly from one section to the next. Clickable blue dots indicate fossils in the main database. The Timeline uses the same chronological approach but via a chart of geological periods: eon, era, period and epoch, and also sites. Users tap on any bar for brief information. The eon, era and period sections have more detail, and extra audio commentary. The Timeglobe is an expandable, rotatable globe which I found fun but a little difficult to control. Using the timemarker allows you to see how earth looked in different eons, useful for demonstrating continental drift.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Events is a scrollable list in chronological order of 17 events significant in evolution from the origin of life to early art via snowball glaciations and human evolution. Each event has one screen of information, some with extra audio commentary, and again you can tap on photos for extra information. The Exhibition is of 34 specially selected fossils in chronological order which have been chosen for more detailed description and analysis. Some also have 360[degrees] views and some have tutorial videos with an expert from the NHM staff.

The Library contains a number of volumes, some providing alternative ways to access the information and some with additional text. Natural History Museum has links to their website and 10 tutorial videos ranging from the very first plants through how and why fish evolved limbs to traces of Neanderthal DNA in the modern human; heroes: the pioneers of evolutionary theory is a searchable, alphabetical list giving a brief biography and explanation of their importance in evolution; fossil index is an AZ of 900+ plants and creatures in a searchable list; a gazetteer of 100 significant fossil sites--this is in chronological order but is searchable ; glossary; and credits.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Evolution: An iPad App from the Natural History Museum
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?