Promoting Language Arts through Vocabulary Development with Internet Resources in the Elementary Classroom

By Lazaros, Edward J. | Children's Technology and Engineering, September 2012 | Go to article overview

Promoting Language Arts through Vocabulary Development with Internet Resources in the Elementary Classroom


Lazaros, Edward J., Children's Technology and Engineering


introduction

Students can have fun while learning new technical vocabulary words. Educators of early childhood students should promote language arts through vocabulary development in the classroom whenever possible. Students need to be exposed to new vocabulary terms on a routine basis. By helping them to develop their vocabulary, students will become more proficient at reading. According to Jalongo and Sobolak (2011), "In order for children to become proficient readers, they need to learn five to six new words per day, 38 words per week, 2000 new words a year, and 10,000 by age 6" (p. 424). Educators of early childhood students can expose students to new technical vocabulary through the use of free Internet resources in the classroom. Specifically, students can use computers in the classroom to access free educational computer games to learn new vocabulary terms.

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background

Vocabulary development can be enhanced if students are engaged actively in learning new words and their meanings. The key is that the students are actively engaged in the development of their vocabulary. According to Jalongo and Sobolak (2011), "All students, regardless of socio-economic status or background, need to make significant gains in receptive and expressive vocabulary at home and at school each year in order to support their growth in literacy" (p. 421). The vocabulary level of a child is associated with gains in reading comprehension. Educators of early childhood students should therefore teach vocabulary effectively (Jolongo and Sobolak, 2011, p. 421).

Vocabulary can be classified in three unique tiers. Tier 1 vocabulary words consist of those that are easily understood, such as "computer" or "door." Tier 1 words can often be pictured by a student or easily described. Tier 2 words are often used by language users who are more mature. These types of words are abstract in nature and sometimes consist of complex ideas, such as "intentional" or "courage." Tier 3 words are those that are specific to a particular subject area. This type of vocabulary might be specifically used in the field of math or science. Examples of tier 3 words include "fulcrum" or "chlorophyll" (Jolongo and Sobolak, 2011, p. 421).

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resources

In the classroom, educators of early childhood students can promote the development of general vocabulary in children and promote the development of technically specific words relating to technology. Educators of early childhood students play an important role in vocabulary development.

According to Jalongo and Sobolak (2011), "There is strong evidence that the home and school environment exert a powerful influence on both the size and depth of children's vocabularies" (p. 423).

Electronic technologies are used by people on a daily basis, and students should become familiar with technical terms. A free interactive Internet resource called "Find The Technology" is available via the URL: www.abcya.

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Promoting Language Arts through Vocabulary Development with Internet Resources in the Elementary Classroom
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