Renewable Electricity Generation Up Quarter as Gas-Fired Power Dips; EXTRA WIND FARM CAPACITY BOOSTING ENERGY FIGURES

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Renewable Electricity Generation Up Quarter as Gas-Fired Power Dips; EXTRA WIND FARM CAPACITY BOOSTING ENERGY FIGURES


Byline: CHRIS KELSEY chris.kelsey@walesonline.co.uk

THE amount of electricity generated by renewables in Wales increased by a quarter between 2010 and 2011, newly released figures show.

Within this the largest single increase came in the wind, wave and solar sector which saw an increase of nearly 50%, from 1,000 GWh (gigawatt hours) to 1,447 GWh.

The increase is due to a combination of increased wind farm capacity and the high uptake of solar pv installations as a result of the Government's feed-in tariff rules.

Meanwhile high gas prices saw a 'dash from gas' with its share of electricity generation in Wales falling by more than 10 percentage points, from 49.8% in 2010 to 39.1% last year - a record low in the period since the report was first published in 2003.

Altogether renewables accounted for 7.9% of Wales' electricity generation in 2011, up from 5% the year before, the latest annual Energy Trends report published by the Department of Energy and Climate Change reveals.

Across the UK renewables' share of electricity generation increased to 11.7% from 9.1% between 2011 and 2012. Offshore wind generation increased by 54%, while onshore wind generation increased by 38%.

Overall, renewable generation was up 25% compared to the same quarter in 2011.

Llywelyn Rhys, deputy director of RenewableUK Cymru, the industry body for the wind, wave and tidal sectors, said: "British homes and businesses are now getting more than 10% of their electricity from renewables on a regular basis, as the figures in the latest Energy Trends Report show.

"Wind is generating the lion's share of our clean electricity, and is set to become even more important in our energy mix for the rest of this decade."

He added: "Renewables are expected to generate more of our electricity than nuclear power by 2016, with wind becoming the biggest contributor of electricity to the UK apart from natural gas in 2010.

"This will help to stabilise the price of energy for all of us, providing a secure alternative to importing expensive fossil fuels, whose price we cannot control.

"Wind is working and delivering - we're all reaping the benefits, which are growing year after year."

The fall in the use of gas for electricity generation was shadowed in England and Scotland, although not by such a large percentage.

In both Wales and England there was an increase in the use of coal in electricity generation, from 18.4% to 22.6% in the case of Wales.

The decline in the use of gas is being attributed to high gas prices during the period covered.

There was an increase in nuclear power's share of generation also, from 17.2% to 19.7% in Wales.

Wales is a net exporter of electricity to England but its transfers fell to a record low in 2011 following several years of decline. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Renewable Electricity Generation Up Quarter as Gas-Fired Power Dips; EXTRA WIND FARM CAPACITY BOOSTING ENERGY FIGURES
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.