Ten Careers Every Policy Student Wishes Existed

By Gustafson, Chris | Kennedy School Review, Annual 2012 | Go to article overview

Ten Careers Every Policy Student Wishes Existed


Gustafson, Chris, Kennedy School Review


10 FREELANCE SOCIAL CHANGER: Hey World Changers, how about sparking social change movements in your spare time? Start out transforming education in Newark and then when you get bored or just irritated with the hard work that it takes--usually sometime around three or four days later--move on to founding health clinics in New Orleans!

9 SAVE-AFRICA-WITHOUT-EVER-HAVING-TO-KNOW-THAT-THERE-ARE-IN-FACT-56-DIFFERENT COUNTRIES-IN-AFRICA COORDINATOR: It's a lot easier to feel like you are solving a continent's problems if you do not have to care about the fact that continents typically have many countries that contain a variety of cultures and languages. Learning how to be effective only hinders your ability to evoke ethos. Who cares that Egypt and Zimbabwe are completely different, the New York Times says they both need saving! After all, Saving Africa just sounds much more fun than improving sanitation in Bamako, Mali.

8 SUSTAINABLE FOOD TESTER: Eat like the 1%, but pat yourself on the back for eating locally grown couscous!

7 USEFUL CONSULTANT: Most policy students wish to develop useful strategies to improve low-performing programs. Unfortunately today's consultants offer PowerPoint-friendly ideas that most people could have figured out on their own or have already dismissed as impractical.

6 BEING DAVID GERGEN: Five presidential administrations, face time on CNN, and a pretty sweet gig at Harvard? …

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