States Slowly Killing Capital Punishment; Md. among 3 to Debate Abolition

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 27, 2012 | Go to article overview
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States Slowly Killing Capital Punishment; Md. among 3 to Debate Abolition


Byline: Valerie Richardson , THE WASHINGTON TIMES

DENVER -- The death penalty, already on the decline across the United States, could face its own demise at the hands of several state legislatures next year.

Accelerating a trend, lawmakers in Colorado, Maryland and New Hampshire are expected to make a push for pulling the plug on capital punishment in the next legislative session, following the moves of Connecticut, which abolished the death penalty this year.

Any action would continue the national trend away from capital punishment. Only nine states carried out executions this year, down from 13 states last year. The same number of people, 43, were executed this year and last, but it was a steep drop from the 85 in 2010, according to a report released last week by the Death Penalty Information Center.

Capital punishment is becoming marginalized and meaningless in most of the country, said Richard Dieter, DPIC executive director. In 2012, fewer states have the death penalty, fewer carried out executions, and death sentences and executions were clustered in a smaller number of states.

Despite the decline in the number of executions, polls consistently show that voters support the idea of capital punishment. In a closely watched test at the ballot in one of the nation's bluest states, Californians in November rejected Proposition 34, which would have eliminated capital punishment, by a margin of 52 percent to 48 percent, even though some late polls suggested that the measure would pass.

Polls from Gallup and the Pew Research Center late last year found that Americans generally favor the death penalty by a roughly 2-1 margin - 62 percent to 31 percent in the Gallup survey, and 61 percent to 35 percent according to Pew. Both polls also found rising opposition to the death penalty since the mid-1990s and falling support for capital punishment. According to Gallup, the 62 percent in favor is the lowest the pollster has recorded since 1972.

California has 724 inmates on death row, the largest number in the nation and nearly twice as many as Florida with 407. At the same time, California has not carried out an execution in seven years, and while voters opted to keep the death penalty, the report noted that support was far lower than in 1978, when 71 percent voted to reinstate capital punishment.

Even with the November vote, California Supreme Court Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye said recently that she does not expect executions in California to resume for at least three years because of problems with the lethal-injection process.

Support for the death penalty remains stronger in red states. South Dakota acted to strengthen its capital-punishment law by limiting death-row inmates to one post-conviction appeal, to be filed within two years. Of the 43 people put to death this year, three-fourths were from four states: Arizona, Mississippi, Oklahoma and Texas.

But Connecticut became the fifth state in five years to repeal the death penalty.

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States Slowly Killing Capital Punishment; Md. among 3 to Debate Abolition
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