Playing Politics with Shopping

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 31, 2012 | Go to article overview

Playing Politics with Shopping


Playing politics with shopping

I have heard from the politicians from both parties on how our economy is based on consumerism, and that in order to boost the economy, we should be buying. But, their inability to do their job by finding a way to avoid sending us back into a recession, by standing behind "what the Republican Party stands for," makes me very wary of going out to "shop until I drop."

This isn't a game of seeing how far each party can spit, and it is the American people who have lived through this crisis and are going to hold them responsible if we should slide back into the recessive times.

Don't tell us to go out and spend, as we hold our breath as they play politics.

We are the ones who will have to endure the hardships. Please relay that living the reality of now is more important than pretending that they are being true to their beliefs.

This may be what has gotten us into this mess in the first place.

Catherine Yoshimura

Chicago

It's debt crisis, not pension crisi

It's important to note the delegates to the 1970 Constitutional Convention never had to run for re-election.

They served in a "one and done" arena and their product still serves as the blueprint for Illinois law. Forty-two years later, their collective wisdom has percolated to the front of the debate over public pensions.

Ralph Martire is perhaps the most reasonable analyst of our public pension debate. As executive director of the bipartisan Center for Tax and Budget Accountability, Mr. Martire perfectly summarizes the problem as a debt crisis, not a pension crisis.

The debt crisis has been exacerbated by chronic legislative borrowing of pension assets to cover daily expenses. It's like a family borrowing from its home equity every month to buy food.

Now, after the worst economic catastrophe since the Great Depression, there is a panicked attempt to strip teachers and other public workers of their constitutionally-guaranteed pension benefits.

The authors of our Constitution guaranteed public pensions because the unfunded liabilities of those systems were virtually identical in 1970 when the Constitution was ratified.

Can you imagine the state refusing to honor other contractual obligations, like those with vendors? …

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Playing Politics with Shopping
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