Slither of Glass That Is a Fragment of History

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), January 10, 2013 | Go to article overview

Slither of Glass That Is a Fragment of History


A FRAGMENT of glass more than 3,000 years old has been identified as one of the missing pieces from a vase once owned an Egyptian pharaoh.

The 4cm-long slither is on display in Swansea University's Egypt Centre. The vase, which belonged to Amenhotep II, who ruled from 1498-1387BC, is in Cairo Museum.

Amenhotep II was the seventh Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt.

He inherited a vast kingdom from his father Thutmose III, who established through 17 military campaigns the biggest empire ever in Egypt. His son held the empire by means of fewer military campaigns, mainly in Syria. The brightly-coloured fragment, on loan to the university from Swansea Museum, displays two names of the ancient Egyptian king picked out in red and yellow on a background of brilliant blue.

Harold Jones The names are surmounted by red sun-disks and yellow feathers.

The glass fragment was given to Swansea Museum in 1959 and circumstantial evidence suggests it came from the tomb of queen Tiye, who was Amenhotep III's wife.

It had been given to Swansea Museum by Annie Sprake Jones of Abergwili, Carmarthenshire. Her brother Harold Jones, who had been employed as an artist in the tombs of the Valley of the Kings ancient burial ground in the early 20th century, gave it to her. …

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