Americans Are Too Smart for Gun Control; History of Restriction Is One of Utter Failure

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 10, 2013 | Go to article overview

Americans Are Too Smart for Gun Control; History of Restriction Is One of Utter Failure


Byline: Michael S. Brown, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

In the wake of the December school shooting in Newtown, Conn., politicians and journalists who hate to see guns in the hands of ordinary citizens turned into a raving mob who sensed that victory over their enemies was near.

Reality is now starting to set in. There are several reasons why we probably won't see any new laws and certainly no laws that will prevent school attacks. The first reason is that the American people are now seeing the hypocrisy and dishonesty of the anti-gun lobby.

For years, we have been promised that President Obama and his party would never move against lawful gun owners. Now that he is not facing any more elections, the promise is forgotten. Who doubts that this was the plan all along?

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, California Democrat, is about to introduce the most restrictive weapons ban in American history. Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York has said that confiscation may be an option. New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is apoplectic at the thought of revolting peasants out there he can't control. All of these politicians are protected by armed guards who can use any guns they wish, but they don't think the public merits the same privileges.

In NBC's Washington studio, Meet the Press moderator David Gregory, while criticizing the National Rifle Association proposal to put armed guards in schools, displayed a 30-round magazine that is prohibited in the District of Columbia. As a member of the media elite, he will never spend a day in jail. It was also revealed that he sends his children to a school that is protected by armed guards. Guns for me, but not for thee.

People are starting to remember that the history of gun control laws is one of utter failure. Ask Mayor Rahm Emanuel of Chicago how his super-strict gun laws are working for him: 506 murders last year, and he is still demanding tougher gun laws.

The federal law that made schools gun-free zones was a proud accomplishment of the anti-gun lobby. Did they know that this would make schools magnets for homicidal lunatics? It seemed like harmless, feel-good legislation at the time, but after seeing how frantically they exploit the deaths of schoolchildren to support their agenda, conspiracy theorists are wondering if it was part of a cynical plan to justify more laws.

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Americans Are Too Smart for Gun Control; History of Restriction Is One of Utter Failure
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