Teaching with Technology: Dr. Shaundra B. Daily Works to Improve Education with Technology

By Roach, Ronald | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, January 3, 2013 | Go to article overview
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Teaching with Technology: Dr. Shaundra B. Daily Works to Improve Education with Technology


Roach, Ronald, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


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From K-12 to graduate school education, innovations in technology in recent years have been transforming classrooms and other learning spaces at a swift pace. Dr. Shaundra B. Daily is an educational technologist whose interdisciplinary training enables her to blend cutting-edge science and engineering with sophisticated pedagogical ideas to design learning technologies.

An assistant professor in the Human-Centered Computing Division in the School of Computing at Clemson University, Daily is in her second year as a faculty member, where she balances an ambitious research portfolio with her teaching. The division is chaired by Dr. Juan Gilbert, an award-winning scholar who is credited with mentoring more African-Americans through computer science Ph.D. programs than anyone.

"Her research [is] just a great fit" for the division, Gilbert says.

A graduate of the celebrated Media Laboratory Ph.D. program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Daily honed her skills and understanding of educational technology in a program that's known for its emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches to research and technology development. "The Media Lab has a long history of designing technologies for teaching and learning," she says.

For Daily, the road to MIT and Clemson only began to take a clear path once she started thinking about the possibility of becoming a professor during her undergraduate years, at Florida State University. As a teenager who attended high school in Birmingham, Ala., Daily had not thought of herself as a "techie."

"I was a dancer, gymnast and cheerleader who happened to be good in math and science," she says.

After earning a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering at Florida State University, the idea of combining teaching and technology took hold. Daily earned a master's degree in electrical engineering from Florida A&M University and went on to MIT.

"I just enjoyed working with students so much and learning so much that I decided that I was going to move more into technology and creating technologies for teaching and learning," Daily says.

At the Media Laboratory, Daily was part of the Affective Computing Group, whose research focused on "new technologies and theories that advance basic understanding of affect and its role in human experience." In other words, the group's adviser, Dr. Rosalind Picard, and students in the group are researching and developing technologies that interact with humans by detecting and utilizing emotional responses in ways that facilitate learning and other activities.

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