Gun Control Regulations Disarm Women; Self-Defense Is a Womanly Virtue

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 17, 2013 | Go to article overview

Gun Control Regulations Disarm Women; Self-Defense Is a Womanly Virtue


Byline: By Gayle Trotter, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Even in the aftermath of unspeakable tragedy like the shootings in Newtown, Conn., gun control zealots advocate mindless and misogynistic policies.

We have to take action, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. urged in response to the Newtown horror. The president is absolutely committed to keeping his promise that we will act.

In other words, to quote a frat boy from the movie Animal House : I think that this situation absolutely requires a really futile and stupid gesture be done on somebody's part.

Mr. Biden's statement may sound high-minded in theory, but new gun control efforts will prove ineffective and self-defeating. The Obama administration's proposals will fail to make Americans safer and, worse still, harm women the most.

In reality, guns make women safer. In a violent confrontation, guns reverse the balance of power. Armed with a gun, a woman may even have the advantage over a violent attacker. More than 90 percent of violent crimes occur without a firearm, according to federal statistics. When a violent criminal threatens or attacks a woman, he rarely uses a gun. Attackers use their size and physical strength, preying on women who are at a severe disadvantage.

How do guns give women the advantage? An armed woman does not need superior strength or the proximity of a hand-to-hand struggle. She can protect her children, elderly relatives, herself or others who are vulnerable to an assailant.

Using a magazine that holds more than 10 rounds of ammunition, she has a fighting chance even against multiple attackers. That is, she can protect herself unless she lives in a jurisdiction like the District of Columbia, which criminalizes possession of even an empty magazine that can hold more than 10 rounds.

Recently, NBC's David Gregory inadvertently exposed the absurdity of the District's gun laws when he displayed a 30-round magazine on national television, embroiling himself in a police investigation. Last week, the D.C. attorney general decided not to charge Mr. Gregory. Despite the clarity of the violation of this important law, he concluded, a prosecution would not promote public safety. When David Gregory's magazines are outlawed, only David Gregory will have magazines. Why is it permissible to possess magazines to persuade people that guns are dangerous, but not for a woman to possess one to defend herself against gang rape?

Armed women benefit even those who choose not to carry. In jurisdictions with concealed-carry laws, women are less likely to be raped, maimed or murdered than they are in states with stricter gun ownership laws.

All women in these states reap the benefits of concealed-carry laws, which dramatically increase the risk that a would-be assailant faces.

In response to horrific incidents like those in Newtown and Aurora, Colo., politicians advocate more restrictions on gun rights. …

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