The Dead of Night: Mark Gatiss Explains the Art of the Perfect Festive Ghost Story

By Gatiss, Mark | New Statesman (1996), December 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Dead of Night: Mark Gatiss Explains the Art of the Perfect Festive Ghost Story


Gatiss, Mark, New Statesman (1996)


Christmas feels like the right time for ghost stories. What makes them work?

There are many types of ghost story but people generally agree that the "English" version is the best. It's something we do very well! And M R James is the undisputed master of the form. Many of his stories were written to be read around Christmas to a select group of friends. He understood the dual nature of the season--the cosiness of sitting round the fire, but at the same time the need to banish the dark.

What makes the English ghost story so distinctive? Perhaps it's because of our interest in repression: James is a master of this, of letting fear seep through the cracks. The terror he creates is monstrous but because it's contained within a sort of fusty academic carapace, it feels both authentic and strangely comforting. As the creator of the "antiquarian" ghost story, he insisted on a historical setting--not necessarily hundreds of years old but 30 or 40. It needs to have some distance. A story told to someone told to someone else ...

Do you think the best ghost-story writers, such as James, were psychologically troubled?

Often in James's stories, something from the past creeps forward that eventually ensnares the protagonist through his or her own avarice, clumsiness or stupidity, with terrible consequences. We can see the roots of this trope in James's own life. Born in 1862, he was brought up in parsonages and rectories, educated at Eton and went to King's College, Cambridge as an undergraduate. He was most comfortable in academia, acting as director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, and returning to his old college as provost in 1905. He stayed there until the last year of the First World War, when he moved back to Eton, again as provost. He was incredibly well-read--he knew the apocrypha of the Bible as well as his own language--but wore it lightly.

James was also a deeply conservative man: he didn't like change and he increasingly feared the future and technology. That must explain why so many of his stories are set within a cosy environment but also in the past, where he felt at home. He actively campaigned to stop women becoming members of his college, for example. Indeed, his fear of women--and particularly of female genitalia--is a recurring theme in his work. His heroes are fusty academics, like him, middle-aged bachelors living a sheltered life, "pent 'mid cloisters dim". Whereas the manifestation of the monster often takes the form of the folklore idea of the vagina dentata--a terrible moment of putting your hand under the pillow and finding something wet and hairy with teeth, say. In "The Diary of Mr Poynter", there is a figure made of hair:

  ... absolute stillness greeted his touch, made him look over the arm.
  What he had been touching rose to meet him. … 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Dead of Night: Mark Gatiss Explains the Art of the Perfect Festive Ghost Story
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.