Say What, Jodie?

By Moynihan, Michael C. | Newsweek, January 18, 2013 | Go to article overview

Say What, Jodie?


Moynihan, Michael C., Newsweek


Byline: Michael C. Moynihan

The meaning of Jodie Foster's moment.

She last directed a film called The Beaver, in which Mel Gibson communicates through a rodent hand puppet, but this didn't deter Golden Globes judges from presenting actress Jodie Foster with the 2013 Cecil B. DeMille Award, in recognition of "outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment." In a show of appreciation, Foster treated 20 million television viewers to a rambling, seven-minute acceptance speech during which she probably came out of the closet, possibly retired from acting, and surely confused her fans.

Within minutes, the Twitter brigades were parsing Foster's every on-stage utterance. Journalists spoke effusively of her "bravery" (Chicago Sun-Times) and her "strength and courage to be authentic" (The Huffington Post). During her sermon, NBC cameras hunted for weepy stars--this was a cultural moment-- training them on Kate Hudson, Emily Deschanel, Marion Cotillard, and Anne Hathaway, as eyeliner ran and eyes welled with tears. Backstage, actress Lena Dunham told reporters that the speech was "mind-blowingly beautiful" and "complex" and "wasn't trying to hand you one moral."

The rest of America seemed to miss Foster's mind-blowing complexity. CNN host Piers Morgan, never one to ignore a passing bandwagon, tweeted that he had "no idea what the hell Jodie Foster just did--but it was brilliant," demonstrating Hollywood's promiscuity in praising its own, often for reasons it doesn't understand.

Talking past ordinary Americans, and standing before millions, Foster rambled about the importance of "privacy" (while introducing her previously anonymous children to the cameras). "Someday, in the future," she declared, "people will look back and remember how beautiful it once was," before the rapacious gossip press destroyed the simplicity of American celebrity. She made nod-and-wink references to her sexuality, leading to breathless news reports that she "came out of the closet" on national television. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Say What, Jodie?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.