Discipline Born of Struggle: African American and African Studies at Ohio State University

By Zulu, Itibari M. | Journal of Pan African Studies, October 2012 | Go to article overview

Discipline Born of Struggle: African American and African Studies at Ohio State University


Zulu, Itibari M., Journal of Pan African Studies


The following interview of H. Ike Okafor-Newsum (H.E. Newsum), chair of the Department of African American and African Studies at The Ohio State University (OSU) was conducted (August 16, 2012) and transcribed by JPAS senior editor Itibari M. Zulu.

Ikechukwu Okafor-Newsum (Horace Newsum) is a sculptor, painter, and installation artist, and a member of the Neo-Ancestralist Artists Collective based in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the Chairperson and Associate Professor of Literature and Political Economy in the Department of African-American and African Studies at The Ohio State University (Columbus). From 1988 to 1991 he served as Director/Program Manager of the OSU Department of African-American and African Studies Community Extension Center. He was born in Memphis, Tennessee where he graduated from Hamilton High School. He received a Doctor of Arts Degree in 1977 from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) in Rhetoric and Sociolinguistics, a Master of Arts (1974) from Governors State University (Illinois) in Cultural Studies, and a Bachelor of Arts (1973) from Chicago State University in English Language and Literature. He is also the principal editor of Working Papers: The Black Woman, Challenges and Prospects for the Future (with Carlene Herb Young et al, 1991). He is author of Class, Language and Education: Class Struggle and Sociolinguistics in an African Situation (1990), co-author of two books, The Use of English (with Adebisi Afolayan, 1983); and United States Foreign Policy Towards Southern Africa: Andrew Young and Beyond (with Olayiwola Abegunrin, 1987). His most recent work is SoulStirrers: Black Art and the Neo-Ancestral Impulse in Cincinnati (University Press of Mississippi, forthcoming in Fall 2013). His current research interests concern art and visual culture, literature, film and mass media. Okafor-Newsum is adjunct associate professor in Film Studies and the Department of English, and faculty associate in the Centers for African Studies and Folklore Studies, and in the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The Ohio State University.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

IMZ: Thank you Dr. H. Ike Okafor-Newsum (H.E. Newsum) for this interview.

HION: You are welcome.

IMZ: From reading your department's website I see that some great things have happened at Ohio State University in regards to African American and African Studies (AAAS) or as it was originally established in October 1969, Black Studies. The program has grown from achieving formal department status in 1972 to becoming one of the strongest African American and African Studies programs in the nation with a comprehensive multidisciplinary BA and MA program; a PhD program in development; study abroad programs to South Africa, Tanzania and Ghana; a Community Extension Center that serves as an outreach arm into the Black community in the city of Columbus (which I had the opportunity to visit); and two academic journals, Research in African Literatures and Spectrum: a Journal About Black Men. Your department now has 21 full-time faculty members. How did all that happen?

HION: Yes, we have made great progress throughout the years. As you may know, we are launching a PhD program, and we are waiting for the final approval by the Ohio Board of Regents. There are fourteen Africana Studies units offering the PhD and of the fourteen only eight have been in existence long enough to have graduated a cohort.

Returning to your question, yes we started our BA program in 1969 and our MA program in 1972. Also in 1972, we opened our Community Extension Center. So you can almost say from the point we began, we have had a free standing facility in the community for outreach and engagement with African people in the state of Ohio.

The way all this came about is historical. Before 1969 there were of course African descended people at Ohio State, and this was not the most welcoming campus for Black students, which was also true at most of the predominately white institutions who may have admitted Black students, but they were not as comfortable on those campuses as they should have been.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Discipline Born of Struggle: African American and African Studies at Ohio State University
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.