Emma Hadn't Slept Properly Her Entire Life; Emma Roberts, 15, of Ross-on-Wye, Is Able to Enjoy a Full Night's Sleep for the First Time in Her Life since Being Treated at Birmingham Children's Hospital, Where the Sunday Mercury's Give A Child Health Fund Is Funding a New PS500,000 Respiratory Centre. Her Father Tim, 51, a Chimney Repairman, Tells ZOE CHAMBERLAIN Why the Help on Offer Is So Important

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), January 27, 2013 | Go to article overview

Emma Hadn't Slept Properly Her Entire Life; Emma Roberts, 15, of Ross-on-Wye, Is Able to Enjoy a Full Night's Sleep for the First Time in Her Life since Being Treated at Birmingham Children's Hospital, Where the Sunday Mercury's Give A Child Health Fund Is Funding a New PS500,000 Respiratory Centre. Her Father Tim, 51, a Chimney Repairman, Tells ZOE CHAMBERLAIN Why the Help on Offer Is So Important


EMMA weighed just under 6lb when she was born, even though she was overdue. She then developed lots of chest infections, so we were in and out of hospital with her.

She had to be tube-fed and she lay on her one side for so long that her face became squashed.

Even today her face is quite triangular, but she hides it well with her long hair.

Her elder brother Kyle was only 15 months when she was born, and Emma's need for care was hard for him.

Unfortunately Kyle and Emma's mother and I split up out before Emma was one. I think she found it difficult to cope.

I'd lie in bed listening to Emma struggling to breathe and think 'Should I take her to hospital or not?' I had good support from my family around me but they couldn't be there 24/7. I worked in warehouses and as a labourer. I tried to carry on working to bring in money but I had to give up my job to give the children the attention they needed.

When she was around 12 months old, Emma was diagnosed with Dubowitz Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder.

I was shocked when I found out all the different aspects of her illness.

There's a one in a million chance of both parents carrying the same disorder and doctors haven't identified which gene carries it.

Emma's mum and I had no idea we were carriers before we had Emma.

It hasn't affected Kyle at all. But looking back now, we can see some elements of the condition in family members on both sides. I had an aunt who used to behave strangely. When things didn't go her way, she reacted violently.

I realised Emma was like her but, because I knew what was going on, I was able to reeducate her not to act like that.

Our local hospital quickly referred us to Birmingham Children's Hospital, thankfully.

Words cannot express how good they have been.

Emma had sleep problems because she couldn't breathe well and she suffered from eczema and asthma.

She went to a special school because she fell so far behind in her development.

Emma didn't mix well, she didn't do the social stuff. She didn't think you should talk to, or touch, anyone.

One day I stood behind her talking and she didn't respond to me, so I made a really loud noise - and she still didn't respond.

It was really worrying.

The health visitor referred us to an audiologist who told us that Emma had severe hearing difficulties.

We could have made 90 decibels of noise two to three inches behind her ear and she wouldn't have heard.

The reason we hadn't realised was that she had taught herself to lip read.

The specialist said she was very accomplished at it. It shows how bright she is. We tried to give her conventional hearing aids but they didn't work. So she had boneanchored hearing aids, which are titanium pegs implanted into her head.

I would have paid to see what happened next. When we came out of the audiology centre and it was like a whole new world had opened up to her.

She said 'I can hear that person talking over there', 'I heard the bus behind me and I've never heard that before.' As a result her confidence quickly grew. It was amazing. It helped her to become more independent.

As a result of her hearing problems, she couldn't annunciate properly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Emma Hadn't Slept Properly Her Entire Life; Emma Roberts, 15, of Ross-on-Wye, Is Able to Enjoy a Full Night's Sleep for the First Time in Her Life since Being Treated at Birmingham Children's Hospital, Where the Sunday Mercury's Give A Child Health Fund Is Funding a New PS500,000 Respiratory Centre. Her Father Tim, 51, a Chimney Repairman, Tells ZOE CHAMBERLAIN Why the Help on Offer Is So Important
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.