Ryan Key in Debt Ceiling Increase; Convinced GOP Fence-Sitters to Back Legislation

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 28, 2013 | Go to article overview

Ryan Key in Debt Ceiling Increase; Convinced GOP Fence-Sitters to Back Legislation


Byline: Seth McLaughlin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Looking to gin up support for a short-term increase in the nation's borrowing limit, House Speaker John A. Boehner turned to Rep. Paul Ryan earlier this month to persuade rank-and-file lawmakers to temporarily back off the dollar-for-dollar spending cuts they had demanded in any debt ceiling hike.

Mr. Ryan, the chairman of the House Budget Committee, delivered, convincing some of the fence-sitters - first at a GOP retreat earlier this month, then at a closed-door caucus meeting last week - that waiving the debt ceiling for four months is the first in a series of moves aimed at putting Republicans back on the offensive in spending battles, and on track toward significant deficit reduction.

We have a great deal of respect for our leadership, but I think we also realize that the Paul Ryans of this Congress bridge the gap that allows us the credibility that I think we need to take this very daring and strategic move ... and accomplish what I think is going to be necessary, which is a balanced budget in 10 years, said Rep. Dennis A. Ross, Florida Republican.

I can't speak for the party nationally, but I think definitely within the conference, his stature rose, said Rep. H. Morgan Griffith, Virginia Republican. People appreciated the way he handled himself on the campaign trail. He was out there fighting for the cause. I would think that that would be true nationally, and I think he's clearly a star in the Republican pantheon of stars.

Ryan speaks out

Democrats clearly think the Wisconsin congressman is a force to be reckoned with: Two months after trouncing the Romney-Ryan ticket at the ballot box, President Obama seemed to single out Mr. Ryan specifically in last week's inauguration address, taking a dig at the congressman's line about takers vs. makers.

After keeping a relatively low profile since the election, Mr. Ryan fired back this weekend, defending his comment in an interview on Meet the Press, and criticizing the president in an address to the Republican faithful at the National Review Institute's Future of Conservatism summit at Washington's Omni Shoreham Hotel on Saturday.

We don't want a dependency culture, he told NBC's David Gregory. We want a safety net that makes sure that people don't fall through the cracks. That gets people on their feet.

One day earlier, at the National Review conference, Mr. Ryan said he has chosen to learn from the first loss of his political career.

The way I see it, our defeat is all the more reason to lay out our vision with even more specifics - and with a broader appeal, Mr. Ryan said in a speech in which he called on Republicans to move forward with prudence. "What I'm saying is, if we want to promote conservatism, we'll need to use every tool at our disposal. Sometimes, we'll have to reject the president's proposals. And sometimes, we'll have to make them better."

Mr. Ryan has developed a reputation as a budget wonk on the GOP side of the aisle, leading the charge for deep spending cuts and reshaping Medicare into a voucherlike program.

The fiscal road maps he has laid out have changed the political dialogue and even spilled over into the GOP presidential primary, where former House Speaker Newt Gingrich's fledgling campaign nearly imploded after he referred to Mr. …

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Ryan Key in Debt Ceiling Increase; Convinced GOP Fence-Sitters to Back Legislation
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