Kerry's First Task Is a Firm Stand on Venezuela; A Narco-Terrorist State Must Be Brought to Justice

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 28, 2013 | Go to article overview

Kerry's First Task Is a Firm Stand on Venezuela; A Narco-Terrorist State Must Be Brought to Justice


Byline: Roger F. Noriega , SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Depending on what happens in Venezuela, there may really be an opportunity for a transition there, incoming U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry told a Senate hearing Thursday, alluding to the expectation that Hugo Chavez may soon lose his bout with cancer. Unfortunately, at this very moment, Mr. Chavez's cronies are doing whatever is necessary to hold on to power indefinitely. The most Mr. Kerry may be able to do is convince Mr. Chavez's successors to end the dangerous alliances with drug traffickers, Iran and Hezbollah that pose a growing threat to U.S. security.

Until now, most of the U.S. foreign policy establishment has ignored the growing body of evidence that homegrown narco-traffickers in Colombia, Central America and Mexico have teamed up with Hezbollah to conduct criminal operations on our doorstep. What's worse, this narco-terrorist alliance is aided and abetted by the governments of Venezuela and Iran. To put it bluntly, this is not mere criminal activity - it is asymmetrical warfare.

For example, just over a year ago, senior Iranian officials sanctioned a plot to commit a massive terrorist bombing in our nation's capital, with the support of a man they thought was associated with the Mexican drug syndicate Los Zetas. Although that plan was thwarted, Hezbollah continues to conspire with drug trafficking networks in Mexico and in Central and South America as a means of raising funds, sharing tactics and reaching out and touching U.S. territory.

U.S. authorities indicted Lebanese drug lord Ayman Joumaa in November 2011 for a cocaine-smuggling and money-laundering scheme that raised millions for Hezbollah. His network, which was uncovered by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and sanctioned by the Treasury Department, involved cocaine kingpins, criminal associates and corrupt banks in Colombia, the United States, Mexico, Panama, Venezuela, Lebanon, Europe and Africa.

The more traditional threats persist, as well. In recent years, Mexico has arrested numerous individuals associated with Hezbollah engaging in criminal activities, including smuggling of persons across the U.S. southwest border. Just in September, Mexicans intercepted Lebanese-born U.S. citizen Rafic Mohammad Labboun Allaboun, who was convicted in 2010 for channeling $100,000 to Hezbollah. He is also suspected of working with Hezbollah operatives in Central America.

In Venezuela, in addition to drug-smuggling and fundraising, Hezbollah has conducted terror training on Margarita Island for recruits from Venezuela and other Latin American countries. According to reliable sources, the world's most powerful cocaine smuggler and head of Mexico's Sinaloa cartel, Joaquin Archivaldo El Chapo Guzman, conducted his business from Venezuela for much of 2010 while living in a suburb of Caracas and on Margarita Island under Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kerry's First Task Is a Firm Stand on Venezuela; A Narco-Terrorist State Must Be Brought to Justice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.