Referendums, Shifts of F Power. and Why We Should All Care

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), February 5, 2013 | Go to article overview

Referendums, Shifts of F Power. and Why We Should All Care


THERE is a month to go until the call for evidence closes in the Silk Commission, which is investigating greater powers for Wales. Here Paul Silk, Chair of the Commission on Devolution in Wales, answers 12 key questions: Q Why was the commission set up? A Following the Welsh referendum in favour of law-making powers for the Assembly, the UK Government set up the Commission to review Wales' financial and constitutional arrangements in order to develop the Assembly's financial accountability and allow devolution to better serve the people of Wales.

Q What kind of powers are you investigating for Wales? A Having reported on the financial powers of the Assembly last November, we are now looking at the powers of the Assembly more generally, that is the boundary between what is devolved and non-devolved. The Commission has an open mind on what specific aspects of the devolution settlement it should look at in detail - we have published a Call for Evidence, which closes on March 1, to hear people's views.

Q Why are you investigating whether powers should return to Westminster? A Our terms of reference were set by the UK Government and agreed with the political parties in the Assembly, and they ask us to consider any modifications to the devolution settlement that may be needed. This could be further devolution or returning powers to Westminster, and we will consider any arguments made.

Q If your recommendations are for significant change, could you also recommend a referendum before any change went ahead? A In our first report, we did recommend a referendum before devolution of income tax to Wales, which would be a truly significant change. That was following a careful examination of the arguments on either side. It's really too early to say whether we would or not for our second report.

Q Will the process of government need to change if the Assembly gets more powers - for example would there need to be more AMs to cope with the extra responsibility? A The Commission has been asked to consider practical implementation issues arising from our work, and also to not look at the structure of the Assembly. We have an open mind at this stage, and look forward to hearing all opinions.

Q How will you decide what changes should be made? A In our first part, we relied a lot on available evidence and what people said to us.

We agreed some principles, thought about each issue carefully, discussed it as a Commission and made the recommendations that we thought were sensible and would improve matters. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Referendums, Shifts of F Power. and Why We Should All Care
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.