The Impact of Global Warming on North Carolina

By Uzochukwu, Godfrey A. | Forum on Public Policy: A Journal of the Oxford Round Table, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

The Impact of Global Warming on North Carolina


Uzochukwu, Godfrey A., Forum on Public Policy: A Journal of the Oxford Round Table


Background

The Science of Climate Change In North Carolina

It has been established that the most common greenhouse gases on earth include carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, water vapor, ozone and chlorofluorocarbons according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (1998); Wilensky and Kane (2008). These gases have increased significantly in the 20th century partly because of human activities. The increase in global carbon dioxide concentration is the result of land use changes and various uses of fossil fuels (IPCC, 2007). Figure 1 shows atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration at Mauna Loa Observatory from 1960 to 2010.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Robinson et al. (2007) argue that the current warming trend is due to climate variation and not because of human activities. William Schlesinger noted in the Legislative Commission on Global Climate Change (LCGCC) report that a correlation between carbon dioxide levels and temperature exists and supported the theory that the rise in carbon dioxide levels is due to human activities including burning of fossil fuel and forest destruction. Schlesinger cited a statement from the American Geophysical Union which states that the temperature of the earth is warming and that warming is caused by humans.

Methodology

The research for this paper used data gathering methods. The first method was a review of North Carolina Climate Commission reports and notes taken during commission meetings. The author was a member of the commission. The second was a review of University task force reports and notes. The author was a member of the task force. The third was a review of literature on global climate change. Fourth, a review of local newspaper reports and observations of climate impacts.

Research Questions

1. How important is global warming impact to North Carolina Legislators?

2. Do colleges and universities have a role in addressing global warming?

3. What are the lines of evidence to support global warming impacts on North Carolina?

4. How can this paper advance the knowledge of global warming?

Research Question 1

Legislative Commission on Global Climate Change (LCGCC)

The North Carolina General Assembly Session Law 2005-442 established the Legislative Commission on Global Climate Change, LCGCC (2005). The commission was made up of thirty four (34) members. The commission was appointed by the leaders of the North Carolina General Assembly to study issues related to global warming; emerging carbon economy; need for global warming pollutant reduction goal and developing recommended goal if necessary. The Commission ended in May 2010, when the final report was adopted. The Commission's work was supported by professionals from the

Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), the Department of Commerce, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Crime Control and Public Safety, and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and researchers from institutions of higher education in the State (Appalachian State University, Duke University, East Carolina University, North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Additionally, national and international experts from several organizations were invited to commission meetings to provide expert opinions on climate change. It was noted in the commission report that actions taken by the states can have a significant effect on global greenhouse gas levels. States have a role in addressing climate change. Stanley Riggs was cited in the LCGCC report that the impact of climate change on eastern North Carolina could be dramatic where elevation in some places is less than 0.6 meter above sea level. Riggs noted that sea levels are predicted to rise 0.9 meter per century, which could cause North Carolina to lose thirty to forty percent of its Coastal Plain leading to significant loss of land. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Impact of Global Warming on North Carolina
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.