How the Compact for America Threatens the Constitution: The Constitutional Convention Proposed by the Compact for America Initiative Would Pose an Unacceptably High Risk of Damage to the Constitution

By Wolverton, Joe, II | The New American, January 21, 2013 | Go to article overview

How the Compact for America Threatens the Constitution: The Constitutional Convention Proposed by the Compact for America Initiative Would Pose an Unacceptably High Risk of Damage to the Constitution


Wolverton, Joe, II, The New American


July 4, 2013. Chartered planes carrying delegates from all 50 states touch down in Dallas, Texas. Thirty-eight states are being represented by their governors with the remaining states represented by one to three state-appointed delegates. These delegates have arrived en masse at the Lone Star State for a historic one-day convention whose sole purpose is purportedly the perfunctory proposal of a balanced budget amendment (BBA) to the Constitution.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Upon arriving at the designated site, the delegates and their retinues settle in around the extraordinarily large conference table and make small talk while taking in the impressive view of the Dallas skyline.

"Ladies and gentlemen." the designated chairman announces, "thank you for corning to this historic meeting and for being willing to stand up to the federal government's runaway spending that is ruining our Republic."

"As you all know," he continues, "we have 24 hours to accomplish the one item on our agenda: the proposal of a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution, as already pre-ratified by 38 (three-fourths) of the state legislatures."

With that brief restatement of the publicized and promised purpose of this high-powered confab, the chairman retakes his seat, awaiting one of the governors to move for a vote on the BBA and another to second that motion.

"Point of order, Mr. Chairman," declares a popular southern governor endowed not only with charisma, but appeal to the powers-that-be in national political circles.

"I certainly agree that this is a historic meeting which is being held to rein in an out-of-control federal government that is ruining our republic. Furthermore, I would remind the chairman that our Founders envisioned just this situation in the Declaration of Independence when they stated:

  We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men
  are created equal, that they are endowed by their
  Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among
  these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of
  Happiness.--That to secure these rights. Governments
  are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers
  from the consent of the governed,--That whenever any
  Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends,
  it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish
  it, and to institute new Government, laying its
  foundation on such principles and organizing its powers
  in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to
  effect their Safety and Happiness."

The popular southern governor continues: "The key part of this quote is, 'That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government.'

"Since the Founders agreed on this right of the People to alter or to abolish our government, and to. institute new Government, they provided a procedure for holding a convention for 'proposing amendments' to our Constitution in Article V of the Constitution itself.

"Today we are gathered here as the duly appointed representatives of the People in just such an Article V constitutional convention. Based on the Right of the People to alter or to abolish our government, and to institute a new government, and in light of the longstanding out-of-control spending by the federal government, I move that the rules previously agreed to by state legislators in our states be set aside and that a new slate of rules for this convention be considered by the body. This new slate of rules would permit any amendment proposals that delegates believe would improve our government in such manner as they believe seems most likely to effect the Safety and Happiness of the People of the United States of America."

"Second the motion," comes the immediate reply from the ambitious governor of a western state.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"Gentlemen, the governor's motion is out of order," the chairman says, rising from his seat. …

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