Carnegie Awards: A New and Important Addition to the Book Scene

By Pagliero, Mary | Reference & User Services Quarterly, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Carnegie Awards: A New and Important Addition to the Book Scene


Pagliero, Mary, Reference & User Services Quarterly


At the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim this past summer, RUSA and Booklist celebrated both their partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York in awarding the first ever Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction and the authors and publishers of these outstanding new books. Please join me in congratulating the winners and the nominees.

The 2012 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction was awarded to Anne Enright for her novel The Forgotten Waltz, published by W. W. Norton.

The 2012 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction was awarded to Robert K. Massie for his work Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman, published by Random House, an imprint of the Random House Publishing.

The other finalists in fiction were Russell Banks, Lost Memory of Skin (Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers), and Karen Russell, Swamplandia (Alfred A. Knopf).

The other finalists in nonfiction were James Gleick, The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood (Pantheon Books), and Manning Marable, Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention (Viking Penguin).

This prestigious Carnegie Medal is the first award from the American Library Association that honors individual adult trade book titles. The leaders of RUSA are very excited about our relationship with the new awards and we look forward to many years of great reading ahead.

THE CARNEGIE AWARD

The Carnegie Corporation is giving the award on the occasion of the centennial of the foundation and in honor of Andrew Carnegie, one of the greatest benefactors of libraries all around the globe. Mr. Carnegie is remembered for his belief that libraries and reading were excellent sources of education and leisure for the working man and his family. Building free public libraries was a priority for his philanthropic activities and he built more than 2,800 libraries in the English-speaking world, placing "education and free inquiry as primary fields of importance in creating a better society." (1)

Nominated books are selected from two long-standing annual lists of books published in the United States in the previous year, the annual Booklist Editors' Choice list and the RUSA CODES Notable Books list. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Carnegie Awards: A New and Important Addition to the Book Scene
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.