Measured Improvement

By Pace, Ann | T&D, February 2013 | Go to article overview

Measured Improvement


Pace, Ann, T&D


Ask any executive today what he expects from the training and development function, and most likely he will use words implying transformation such as "change" and "performance improvement." Ask any training and development professional to describe her role's primary objective, and she will agree--producing measurable results of individual or organization improvement is imperative.

The following leadership development suppliers understand the need for solutions that effectively measure and evaluate performance. From experiential learning to talent management and online professional education, these diverse companies emphasize measurable development and performance growth.

Eagle's Flight

Global training firm Eagle's Flight specializes in experiential learning programs aimed to achieve tangible business results through permanent, positive behavioral change. "Leader performance improvement is at the core of most of Eagle's Flight's programs because we believe that the leader's behavior is critical to the performance of the team as a whole," says John Wright, president of leadership development.

Journey of Leadership is Eagle's Flight's approach to developing leadership strength on an organizational scale. It consists of a tiered series of interrelated training programs that address key leadership behaviors at the individual, team, and senior levels. This program supports the company's belief in the concept of leaders-in-waiting, "which presumes that leadership potential exists in people who are not currently in leadership positions," explains Wright.

Leveraging Eagle's Flight's trademark brand of experiential design, Journey of Leadership teaches solid leadership principles through an interactive, engaging approach and within a supportive learning environment. "Journey of Leadership targets the major factors that will determine not just the quality of the leader's performance (such as accountability for business commitments and exceptional execution), but also the team's impact," Wright adds. "As a whole, the series creates a foundation of leadership consistency and integration that translates into a powerful business advantage, retention of talent, and an internal map for succession."

With Eagle's Flight's focus on behavior transformation, it is not surprising that the company emphasizes performance improvement evaluation. Its Performance Measurement Division ensures that an organization's training activities are aligned, relevant, and measurable, and provides the insight and data needed to demonstrate ongoing learning impact. Using comprehensive needs analyses, organizational surveys, 180- and 360-degree assessments, competency model development, and training impact scorecards, Eagle's Flight's diverse performance and behavior metrics span from pre- and post-program evaluations to specific behavior and business measures.

To help clients attain their performance outcomes, Eagle's Flight provides coaching support and retention services. "Our clients experience tangible results such as fewer errors or rework due to clarified roles and objectives, higher rates of employee satisfaction and retention because of greater engagement, and improved sales results due to better leadership coaching and guidance," says Wright.

2013 marks Eagle Flight's 25th year of delivering experiential learning solutions. To help celebrate this milestone, the company is introducing two new programs: Sales MBA is a sales execution process that re-energizes productivity, focuses on goals, and condenses sales cycles; and Safe by Choice is a safety culture complement to all technical safety training.

Development Dimensions International

In a recent study by Development Dimensions International (DDI) and The Economist, three-quarters of senior executives list talent as their most critical business imperative. Talent management--defined as selecting, developing, and retaining the best leaders and workforce--is the business of DDI.

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