What's Next for Amateur Theatre; the Last Gilbert and Sullivan Operetta, an Antidote to Valentine's Day Schmaltz and Some Period Movie Madness. DAVID WHETSTONE Previews the Amateur Stage

The Journal (Newcastle, England), February 12, 2013 | Go to article overview

What's Next for Amateur Theatre; the Last Gilbert and Sullivan Operetta, an Antidote to Valentine's Day Schmaltz and Some Period Movie Madness. DAVID WHETSTONE Previews the Amateur Stage


Byline: DAVID WHETSTONE

THE omens don't look great for any company tackling the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, The Grand Duke.

It was the 14th and last operetta by the famous pair - librettist WS Gilbert and composer Arthur Sullivan - and a financial flop.

"The production has not been without its difficulties," report the St Andrew's Operatic Society, which is performing The Grand Duke this week in Sunderland.

Uh oh, you think. But the society adds that its failure to obtain orchestral scores was overcome when a conductor's score was acquired from Seattle, USA.

A talented member of the Wearside cast was able to convert the conductor's score into the individual scores needed for the 17 musicians of the orchestra.

A cast of 45 plus orchestra has been mustered by the society which is performing The Grand Duke for the first time in Sunderland.

The production is directed by Keith Armitage and Peter Shreyhane with Ken Matthews as conductor.

Among the principals are Richard Straw, Kathy Price, Phillip Hall, Rory Oliver, Paul Blakey, Kayleigh Oliver, Bernadette Trotter, Simon McLouglin, Jennifer Bain and Elizabeth Hamer. The Grand Duke - or The Statutory Duel - is a delicious piece of English musical eccentricity.

The cast will be heartened to know it enjoyed a successful opening night at London's Savoy Theatre on March 7, 1896. See the St Andrew's production at the Priestman Hall, Talbot Road, Roker, from tomorrow until Saturday.

Tickets from Joan Cook on 0191 529 3439 and Smith's Shoes Services, Sea Road, Fulwell, on 0191 548 3232.

? THIS week of Valentine's Day the People's Theatre presents "an ideal antidote to schmaltzy hearts and flowers". It is the "darkly comic drama of obsession, honour and revenge" that is August Strindberg's play, Creditors.

The production running at the People's, Stephenson Road, Newcastle, from today until Saturday is the regional premiere of Scottish playwright David Greig's acclaimed translation of the play.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What's Next for Amateur Theatre; the Last Gilbert and Sullivan Operetta, an Antidote to Valentine's Day Schmaltz and Some Period Movie Madness. DAVID WHETSTONE Previews the Amateur Stage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.