What's on; We Give Our Verdict on This Week's Latest Film Releases, Which Include Jeremy Renner and Gemma Arterton in Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters, Russell Crowe in the Political Thriller Broken City, and Julianne Hough in Safe Haven

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), February 28, 2013 | Go to article overview

What's on; We Give Our Verdict on This Week's Latest Film Releases, Which Include Jeremy Renner and Gemma Arterton in Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters, Russell Crowe in the Political Thriller Broken City, and Julianne Hough in Safe Haven


HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS 3D (15, 88 mins) Fantasy/Action/Horror/ Romance. Jeremy Renner, Gemma Arterton, Famke Janssen, Thomas Mann, Pihla Viitala, Peter Stormare and the voice of Robin Atkin Downes. Director: Tommy Wirkola. Contains swearing and violence.

DIRECTOR Tommy Wirkola puts a bloodthirsty new spin on the classic fairytale in this gleefully violent fantasy.

Hansel& Gretel: Witch Hunters does exactly what it says in the snappy title: expands the story of two children held hostage by a crone in a gingerbread house into a full-blooded battle between the forces of good and evil.

The script marries action movie convention with an olde worlde setting, providing the titular heroes with an arsenal of pithy one-liners as they despatch the enemy.

"She looks angry," remarks Gretel, staring at one restrained hag.

"Wouldn't you be if you had a face like that?" quips Hansel, who intends to make her face look far worse by unleashing twin barrels at point-blank range in stomach-churning 3D.

There is no such thing as overkill here. Hansel (Jeremy Renner) and his feisty sister Gretel (Gemma Arterton) had their first encounter with witches as children when they stumbled into a house made of delicious candy.

Through luck and enterprise, the siblings flung the diabolical crone into her oven, establishing their reputation throughout the land as protectors against the dark arts.

Hansel and Gretel grow up with a hatred for these shape-shifting creatures and devote every waking minute to hunting down witches with their ingenious homemade weapons.

When several children from one sleepy village go missing, Sheriff Berringer (Peter Stormare) blames local woman Mina (Pihla Viitala) and prepares to burn her as a witch.

The eponymous heroes intervene in the nick of time.

"I'm not going to have you telling me what to do!" barks the Sheriff.

Gretel settles the argument with a headbutt and frees Mina, who takes an immediate shine to smitten Hansel.

The siblings set about tracking down powerful grand witch Muriel (Famke Janssen), who is kidnapping local tykes as a sacrifice during the forthcoming night of the Blood Moon.

The witches are aided by a hulking ogre called Edward (voiced by Robin Atkin Downes), who carries off children into the night.

With the odds stacked against them, Hansel, Gretel and an enthusiastic protege (Thomas Mann) lay their lives on the line to save the children and send Muriel and her coven back to hell.

BROKEN CITY (15, 109 mins) Thriller/Action/Romance. Mark Wahlberg, Russell Crowe, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Jeffrey Wright, Barry Pepper, Natalie Martinez, Kyle Chandler, Alona Tal. Director: Allen Hughes. Contains swearing and violence WE don't need serpentine thrillers such as Broken City to remind us that politics is a grubby business.

As recent headlines attest, elected authority figures who we trust to shape and reform our laws can occasionally ride roughshod over those same rules and regulations.

Allen Hughes's film argues that to affect lasting change in the corridors of power, you have to be prepared to get your hands bloody. Or pay someone else to get their money-grabbing mitts filthy on your behalf.

It's a parable for our corrupt, power-hungry times. …

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What's on; We Give Our Verdict on This Week's Latest Film Releases, Which Include Jeremy Renner and Gemma Arterton in Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters, Russell Crowe in the Political Thriller Broken City, and Julianne Hough in Safe Haven
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