Special Education Needs Its Funding

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Special Education Needs Its Funding


Special education needs its funding

Watch out is right when dealing with changes to special education rules and laws ("Proceed with caution," Soapbox, Feb. 23). Many of these laws are federally based and funded and for good reason, one of them being so local schools cant start cutting corners, increasing class sizes and basically discriminating against special needs students. Yes, they take more time, more resources and money. Thats why many years ago laws were passed to guarantee these students an education in a public school setting.

I have a child who went through the special education system in the public schools in Districts 59 and 214 during the 1980s and 1990s. Even with the stringent laws in place, I still had to fight for services and monitor constantly that those services were being delivered. Changing those rules and regulations would only serve to hurt the children who so desperately need those services. Lets balance their school budgets another way, not on the backs of those most vulnerable and least able to speak for themselves.

Barbara Gier

Prospect Heights

Real issue is gangs, not guns

It is very interesting how the lead stories are often described as "more gun violence," when the same stories last year were described as "more gang violence." Because law enforcement has been completely ineffective in combating street gangs, the focus has been shifted to guns. What an easy way to mask the real problem.

Dave Boesche

Hoffman Estates

Start reducing population growth

I really liked the Guest View article titled, "Crowding our Earths other inhabitants." I agree with the writer, there is not enough focus on the real problem where the pollution comes from: population growth. …

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