Wanted: Foreign Students: State Colleges and Universities Are Increasing Their Efforts to Attract Students from Abroad

By Weiss, Suzanne | State Legislatures, March 2013 | Go to article overview

Wanted: Foreign Students: State Colleges and Universities Are Increasing Their Efforts to Attract Students from Abroad


Weiss, Suzanne, State Legislatures


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Bright, adventurous and fluent in three languages, 18-year-old Chelsea Tan came to the United States last fall to begin a rigorous course of study leading to a degree in health physics--an opportunity she wouldn't have had in her native Malaysia.

"Back home, Malays are given preference in admission to universities," says Tan, who is half-Chinese. "And even if I had been accepted, there are hardly any advanced programs in physics, which is what I wanted to study."

So Tan, whose parents are footing the bill for her college education, selected Colorado State University from among several schools that appealed to her. She is learning how to ski, planning to visit New York and Los Angeles, and enjoying participating in a new school program called "Global Village," designed specifically for international students.

Typically the best and brightest of their countries' young people, foreign students like Tan bring entrepreneurial energy and talent to American colleges and universities particularly in the fields of science, math and engineering. Their presence on campuses and in communities can enrich the culture and further the increasingly vital goal of improving cross-cultural fluency and understanding.

One of the biggest benefits many see in attracting foreign students, however, has to do with economics. They contribute $20.2 billion a year to the U.S. economy--in tuition, fees, rent, transportation, food and other living expenses, according to the Association of International Educators.

With revenues lethargic and national student populations tapering off, a growing number of states are working hard to enlarge their share of this booming international higher-education market. Legislators in at least 23 states have passed joint resolutions calling attention to the importance of either attracting foreign students to study in America or sending American students to study abroad.

"The world is really shrinking, and so we know that we've got to do more to attract top students from other countries, and give our own kids the chance to interact with other cultures," says West Virginia Senator Bob Plymale (D), chairman of the Senate Education Committee. "We want to be a leader in internationalizing our colleges and universities."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

A Joint Effort

Postsecondary institutions are working together under various states' banners--Destination Indiana, Study Texas, Education USA Vermont and so on--to develop marketing campaigns to recruit foreign students to their states.

These state consortia, which include both public and private and two- and four-year institutions, are designed to heighten the profile of a state's entire higher-education portfolio, from flagship state universities to community colleges to small, liberal arts institutions.

These groups typically are involved in marketing their schools through websites and social media; collaborating with state economic development, tourism and foreign-trade agencies; and sending representatives to higher-education fairs sponsored by the U.S. State Department throughout the world.

Over the past several years, postsecondary institutions in 24 states--Alabama, California, Colorado, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin--have formed consortia focused on recruiting greater numbers of "internationally mobile" students, and Florida, Montana and North Carolina are looking at doing so. Several states have regional initiatives under way: Campus Philly and Global Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, Study Western Massachusetts in Massachusetts, and Metro NY in New York.

Although these groups enjoy the backing of a wide range of political, business and education leaders, support from legislators can make the difference. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wanted: Foreign Students: State Colleges and Universities Are Increasing Their Efforts to Attract Students from Abroad
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.