Lingering Vacancies Burden Judiciary; Nominations Lag, Cases Grow

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 12, 2013 | Go to article overview

Lingering Vacancies Burden Judiciary; Nominations Lag, Cases Grow


Byline: Sean Lengell, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A backlog of judicial vacancies at federal courts is straining the nation's justice system - delaying trials, increasing workloads for judges and posing a disincentive for talented lawyers from pursuing careers on the bench, legal analysts say.

With split government in Washington, the problem isn't going anywhere soon.

It's just a tragedy. Once you affect conditions like that negatively, it's not an easy fix to go back, said Susan Low Bloch, a Georgetown University Law Center professor. There is no excuse to do this to [a judicial] institution that is really an unusually good institution.

The Senate on Monday voted without dissent to confirm two White House judicial nominees - Richard Gary Taranto for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and Andrew Patrick Gordon to the U.S. District Court for Nevada. The move reduced the tally of vacant federal judgeships nationwide to 85.

Both nominations have sat in limbo since the previous Congress. President Obama initially sent Mr. Taranto's name to the Senate for confirmation in 2011, and Mr. Gordon has waited since September.

The vacancy list - which includes 67 district, 16 appeals and two international trade court slots - is about 30 more than when Mr. Obama first took office in 2009 and more than double the number at the same point of George W. Bush's presidency, according to U.S. Courts statistics.

Think of a military operating with 65 percent of its capacity, said Carl Tobias, a professor at the University of Richmond School of Law. There is a mentality [in Congress] that the judiciary is another federal agency. Well, no, it's not. It's a third branch of government, and they need the respect that's due them.

Vacancies have led to 30 judicial emergencies declared on federal courts nationwide, meaning case filings - using a complicated formula weighted on their importance - have reached a peak amount.

Among the courts hit most seriously with the vacancy bug is the influential D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, as four of its 11 seats are empty. The court is considered second only to the Supreme Court in level of importance because it handles challenges to most federal rule-making and oversees federal agencies based in Washington.

Mr. Obama twice has nominated Caitlin Halligan for the D.C. appeals court, but Senate Republicans have used filibusters to block her bid - most recently Wednesday - after accusing her of being a liberal activist.

Democrats countered that she would be an impartial jurist who at the very least deserves an up-or-down vote based on her qualifications, which include serving as solicitor general for the state of New York and clerking for Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. …

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Lingering Vacancies Burden Judiciary; Nominations Lag, Cases Grow
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