Technology and Engineering Career Opportunities That Use Mathematics

By Lazaros, Edward J. | Children's Technology and Engineering, March 2013 | Go to article overview

Technology and Engineering Career Opportunities That Use Mathematics


Lazaros, Edward J., Children's Technology and Engineering


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

introduction

While, on the surface, many technical and engineering careers may not appear to use mathematics extensively, this couldn't be farther from the truth. Studying mathematics and science in school is necessary to become prepared for university programs that will lead to careers in aerospace engineering, agricultural engineering, materials engineering, architecture, or surveying, where mathematics is an integral part of the daily routine.

aerospace engineering

Aerospace engineers rely heavily on mathematics. Principles found in advanced mathematics such as trigonometry and calculus are necessary for design work, analysis, and troubleshooting. Aerospace engineers are typically involved with the design and development of spacecraft, aircraft, satellites, and missiles. They are also involved with the development of new technologies to be used in the aerospace industry. These technologies may include guidance systems, navigation controls, robotics, combustion systems, or instrumentation to name a few. To become an aerospace engineer, a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering is required. In addition to a degree, many companies require security clearances that need to be obtained through the U.S. Government. The aerospace profession is estimated to grow by five percent between 2010 and 2020. Since many aerospace engineers are involved with defense-related projects that require security clearances, these jobs will most likely remain in the United States and are not likely to be "off-shored" for cheaper labor (U.S. Department of Labor, 2012).

The U.S. Department of Labor (2012) reports the median annual salary of an aerospace engineer at $97,480 as of May 2010. Salary.com (2012) reports the median base salary as $62,278 and indicates 401k/403B retirement plans, disability insurance, healthcare insurance, and time off are typical benefits that accompany the base salary.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

agricultural engineering

Agricultural engineers use mathematics and technology in many of the activities in their industry, which include designing machinery and equipment with computer-aided design technology, testing machinery and equipment, designing food-processing plants, designing structures to house animals and crops, and control water resources. A bachelor's degree is required in agricultural engineering or biological engineering. Students in school should plan to take advanced mathematics courses in trigonometry and calculus as well as coursework in biology, chemistry, and physics. With regard to employment outlook, a growth rate of nine percent is expected for agricultural engineers between 2010 to 2020. As the United States markets its agricultural technology to other countries, additional job opportunities may be created (U.S. Department of Labor, 2012).

The U.S. Department of Labor (2012) reports the median annual salary of an agricultural engineer at $71,090 as of May 2010. Salary.com (2012) does not report specific salary information for agricultural engineers; however, a related occupation called soil science lists a median base salary as $63,830.

materials engineering

Materials engineers use mathematics when testing the structure of materials and determining how materials fail. Data from failure tests can help to determine causes as well as possible solutions. Materials engineers not only test materials, they are involved with the development of materials to be used in products ranging from computer chips to golf clubs. Individuals in this profession get to work with metals, plastics, ceramics, composites, and semiconductors. A bachelor's degree is required; practical experience through a cooperative program is recommended. Students in school should pursue coursework in algebra, trigonometry, calculus, biology, chemistry, and physics. The projected growth rate is nine percent for materials engineers from 2010 to 2020. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Technology and Engineering Career Opportunities That Use Mathematics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.